Navy SEAL Chief Eddie Gallagher has been released from pretrial custody ahead of his court-martial on charges for allegedly killing a wounded ISIS fighter and other offenses.

Navy Capt. Aaron Rugh, the military judge in the case, decided to release Gallagher at the end of a hearing on Thursday, said Navy Region Southwest spokesman Brian O'Rourke. Gallagher's trial is expected to begin in about two weeks.

The victory for Gallagher comes as President Donald Trump is reportedly considering pardons for the SEAL along with Army Maj. Matthew Golsteyn and three former Marine Scout Snipers who urinated on Taliban corpses.

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(Flickr/Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff/Staff Sgt. Sean K. Harp)

Retired U.S. Navy Adm. William McRaven, a former Navy SEAL who oversaw the Osama bin Laden raid in 2011, warned that President Donald Trump "needs to be very careful" about a presidential pardon for several military veterans accused of war crimes.

"I think the president needs to be very careful at this point," McRaven said in a Fox News interview on Tuesday. "Obviously the president can pardon [whomever] he thinks is appropriate to pardon."

"But the way it works in the military, you have to be careful as a senior commander about unduly influencing the process before the investigation has been adjudicated," McRaven added.

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(Reuters/Kevin Lamarque)

"Fox & Friends" weekend co-host Pete Hegseth has been working behind the scenes to convince President Donald Trump to pardon U.S. service members accused or convicted of war crimes, according to a recent report in the Daily Beast.

The New York Times reported Saturday that Trump is taking steps to officially pardon service members accused of committing war crimes whose cases have garnered significant media attention by Memorial Day. This comes after Hegseth, an Iraq War veteran, spent months encouraging Trump in private to issue the controversial pardons.

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President Donald Trump could issue a pardon on Memorial Day for Navy SEAL Chief Eddie Gallagher, former Special Forces Maj. Matthew Golsteyn, and Marine Scout Snipers accused of urinating on Taliban corpses, the New York Times is reporting.

The White House is working with the Justice Department and military services to get the paperwork necessary for the pardons in order, according to the Times.

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