WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Representative Seth Moulton, who mounted a long-shot bid for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, ended his campaign on Friday, warning that the party must now decide how far left it wants to move.

"But today, I want to use this opportunity ... to announce that I am ending my campaign for president," Moulton was to say at a speech before a Democratic National Committee meeting in San Francisco, according to remarks provided by his campaign.

Read More Show Less
(Associated Press photo)

A small group of lawmakers is arguing that President Donald Trump does not have the power to launch a new war against Iran without first getting permission from Congress.

Chief among them is Rep. Seth Moulton (D-Mass.), who was one of six lawmakers who voiced their support on Wednesday for a proposed amendment to the fiscal 2020 National Defense Authorization Act that would prevent any federal money from funding a war with Iran unless Congress declared war or Trump secured a new authorization for the use of military force.

Only after Congress has had a "thorough debate of the facts, the findings, and the intelligence presented to us" should lawmakers decide whether the United States should go to war with Iran, said Moulton, a Marine veteran who deployed to Iraq four times.

Read More Show Less
(Associated Press photo)

WASHINGTON — Seth Moulton, a former combat Marine who's running for the Democratic presidential nomination, revealed he sought treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder as he proposed expanded mental health care for veterans and others.

Moulton, a Massachusetts congressman who was first elected in 2014, said in an interview with Politico that he first sought counseling in 2009, after serving in Iraq.

Read More Show Less

The Trump administration is trying to assure Congress that it does not want to start a war with Iran, but some lawmakers who fought in Iraq are not so sure.

Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford both briefed Congress on Tuesday about Iran. Shanahan told reporters earlier on Tuesday that the U.S. military buildup in the region has stopped Iran and its proxies from attacking U.S. forces, but the crisis is not yet over.

"We've put on hold the potential for attacks on Americans," Shanahan said. "That doesn't mean that the threats that we've previously identified have gone away. Our prudent response, I think, has given the Iranians time to recalculate. I think our response was a measure of our will and our resolve that we will protect our people and our interests in the region."

Read More Show Less
© 2018 Hirepurpose. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service.