Photo illustration by Paul Szoldra/Task & Purpose

Fifteen pounds.

That seems to be what separates a high-performing Marine from eventually becoming a combat casualty, according to new research carried out by a Marine captain at the Naval Postgraduate School.

In her award-winning master's thesis, titled Paying For Weight In Blood: An Analysis of Weight and Protection Level of a Combat Load During Tactical Operations, Capt. Courtney Thompson argues that being able to move faster is more important against near-peer enemies in combat, and the all-too-common trend of burdening troops with heavier loads can lead to an increase in casualties.

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(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Melanye Martinez

The next time a hurricane strikes Florida or Texas, relief may come from robots in the sky.

The Pentagon wants drones to transport supplies for disaster relief. And not for overseas disasters, but when bad things happen on American soil.

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Orion Pictures

You're at a bazaar-style open market, walking down the street when you spot a lovely shirt you'd like to buy.

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U.S. Army/Spc. Scott Lindblom

Toxic breast milk. Contaminated umbilical cords. Testicular cancer. Organ failure.

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Getty Images/The Washington Post/Astrid Riecken

When it comes to the subject of medical weed research, or even whether it’s okay for a vet and physician to discuss medicating with herb, the Department of Veterans Affairs has a tendency of ducking action in favor of citing hazy policy, and vague restrictions.

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Flickr/Morgan Page

Veterans who are married or in a live-in relationship have a higher risk of suicide than their single counterparts, according to a new study from the Department of Veterans Affairs and the University of Connecticut.

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