A rigorous scientific study found out what any grunt knows after just two weeks in the field: MREs make it hard to take a shit.

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Former Blink-182 vocalist Tom DeLonge .The U.S. Army. No, this isn't the most unusual team-up in pop culture history — it's a bona fide investigation into the mysteries of super-science.

To The Stars Academy of Arts & Science (TTSA) — DeLonge's unusual research company founded and purveyor of authentic U.S. government footage of military UFO encounters —on Thursday announced that it had entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with the Army Combat Capabilities Development Command.

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U.S. Marine 1st Lt. Johnathon Bradley, an MV-22 pilot with Marine Medium Tilt Rotor Squadron 165, attached to Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force Crisis Response-Central Command, uses night-vision goggles to observe an ordnance range during a tail-gunner certification course in which Marines qualify with the M2 Browning 50 caliber machine gun from the rear of an MV-22B Osprey in southwest Asia Jan. 23, 2019. (U.S. Marine Corps/Cpl. Alina Thackray))

The U.S. military may be working overtime to reduce the weight of a standard-issue pair of night vision googles to the point where it feels like you're wearing nothing at all, but a group of scientists think they've cracked the code of "built-in" night vision thanks to dollop of special particles and a needle to the eyeball.

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Sgt. Ryan Blount, 27th Brigade, New York Army National Guard, rests in a hallway after a full day of field training, before heading back out Jan. 16, 2015, at Alexandria International Airport, La. (U.S. Air Force/Senior Airman Cliffton Dolezal)

(Reuters Health) - Soldiers who experience sleep problems during basic combat training may be more likely to struggle with psychological distress, attention difficulties, and anger issues during their entry into the military, a recent study suggests.

"These results show that it would probably be useful to check in with new soldiers over time because sleep problems can be a signal that a soldier is encountering difficulties," said Amanda Adrian, lead author of the study and a research psychologist at the Center for Military Psychiatry and Neuroscience at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in Silver Spring, Maryland.

"Addressing sleep problems early on should help set soldiers up for success as they transition into their next unit of assignment," she said by email.

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U.S. Soldiers navigate a stream during a security patrol in Chabar, Afghanistan, Dec. 3, 2009. (U.S. Air Force/Tech. Sgt. Francisco V. Govea II)

(Reuters Health) - Soldiers who displayed high optimism before deployment were less likely to develop chronic pain after being sent to Afghanistan or Iraq than those who were more pessimistic, a new study finds.

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