(Associated Press/Gregory Bull)

The Navy has paused proceedings that could strip Eddie Gallagher and three other SEALs of their tridents while the service awaits a written order to formally stand down, a senior Navy official told Task & Purpose on Thursday.

Rear Adm. Collin Green, the head of Naval Special Warfare Command, was expected to decide on the matter after the SEALs appeared before a review board next month. But Trump tweeted on Thursday that Gallagher was in no danger of losing his trident, a sacred symbol of being part of the SEAL community.

"The Navy will NOT be taking away Warfighter and Navy Seal Eddie Gallagher's Trident Pin," the president tweeted. "This case was handled very badly from the beginning. Get back to business!"

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President Donald Trump has nixed any effort by the Navy to excommunicate Eddie Gallagher from the SEAL community.

"The Navy will NOT be taking away Warfighter and Navy Seal Eddie Gallagher's Trident Pin," the president tweeted on Thursday. "This case was handled very badly from the beginning. Get back to business!"

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Defense Secretary Mark Esper was tightliped on Wednesday on what he recommended to President Donald Trump about possibly exonerating three service members accused or convicted of war crimes.

Trump could order the Army to dismiss charges against Maj. Matthew Golsteyn and former 1st Lt. Clint Lorance as well as tell the Navy to restore Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher's rank as a chief petty officer, Fox News contributor Pete Hegseth said on Monday's edition of Fox & Friends.

"I had a robust discussion with the president yesterday and I offered – as I do in all matters – the facts, the options, my advice, the recommendations and we'll see how things play out," Esper told reporters on Wednesday after meeting with a Qatari official.

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(U.S. Army photo)

A Navy SEAL and a Marine Raider charged with murder in connection with the hazing death of Special Forces Staff Sgt. Logan Melgar are scheduled to appear at an Article 32 hearing on Aug. 5, Navy officials have announced.

Navy Special Operations Chief Tony DeDolph and Gunnery Sgt. Mario Madera-Rodriguez are accused of taking part in the June 2017 assault on Melgar in Bamako, Mali.

The Washington Post previously reported that four U.S. troops, a British special operator, and a Malian security guard intended to bind Melgar and make a video of him being sexually assaulted.

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(DoD photo by Claudett Roulo.)

The Navy's top officer has ordered a review of how it investigates and separates sailors for misconduct following former Navy SEAL Eric Greitens recent transfer to the Selected Reserves and other cases, a Navy official confirmed on Friday.

Dan Lamothe of the Washington Post first reported that Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson ordered the 30-day review after Greitens returned to the Navy.

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A Navy SEAL who is one of four service members charged in connection with the death of a Green Beret in Mali nearly two years ago will "take full responsibility for his role" in the incident at a hearing next week, his lawyer said.

Chief Special Warfare Officer Adam Matthews has reached a pretrial agreement under which he will be referred to a special court-martial rather than a general one, said his attorney Grover Baxley. The maximum penalty that a special court-martial can impose is one year in prison, reduction in rank to E-1, forfeiture of two-thirds pay for one year, and a bad conduct discharge.

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