Men ride motorbikes past a member of Iraqi federal police in a street in Baghdad, Iraq October 7, 2019. (Reuters/Wissm al-Okili)

BAGHDAD (Reuters) - Days of deadly anti-government protests in Baghdad and other Iraqi cities brought few real concessions from the authorities. But when bloodshed spread to one particular poor, restive Baghdad district, they responded differently.

After protesters were killed in Sadr City, the military ordered an army withdrawal from the area and security forces for the first time admitted using excessive force, promising to hold those involved in violence against civilians to account.

More money has also been promised to help the poor.

Signs of an escalation in the sprawling residential district, from where Shi'ite insurgents once attacked U.S. forces after the 2003 U.S. invasion, spooked the government as it would mean serious trouble for Iraq and much bloodier unrest, security forces, local leaders, lawmakers and analysts say.

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U.S. military snipers have to be able to make the hard shots, the seemingly impossible shots. They have to be able to push themselves and their weapons.

Staff Sgt. Hunter Bernius, a veteran Marine Corps scout sniper who runs an advanced urban sniper training course, walked INSIDER through his most technically difficult shot — he fired a bullet into a target roughly 2.3 kilometers (1.4 miles) away with a .50 caliber sniper rifle.

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Test Snipers engage targets in depth at ranges varying from 300 to 1,000 meters from a standing supported position during the Compact, Semi-Automatic Sniper Rifle (CSASS) operational test at Fort Carson, Colo.(U.S. Army/Maj. Michael P. Brabner)

The Army may only have scored full approval from Congress to buy thousands of new M110A1 Compact Semi-Automatic Sniper Systems (CSASS) last year, but a cadre of Army snipers are already flexing on some upgrades.

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Best Sniper competition at Fort Bliss, Texas. Photo: Staff Sgt. Killo Gibson/U.S. Army

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

Snipers are masters of disguise who are able to hide in plain sight, providing overwatch, scouting enemy positions, and, when necessary, taking out threats.

"No one knows you're there. I'm here. I'm watching you, I see everything that you are doing, and someone is about to come mess up your day," First Sgt. Kevin Sipes, a Texas native and experienced US Army sniper, said during a recent interview.

"We are capable of hurting you in many ways ... We're not going to tell you how we're coming. But, we're coming for you."

Business Insider asked a handful of trained Army snipers, elite sharpshooters who have served across multiple combat deployments in multiple countries, how they disappear in any and all environments. Here's what they had to say.

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Staff Sgt. William Frye/US Army

A photograph of an Army sniper remaining still as a snake slithers across his barrel has gone viral.

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U.S. Army/Sgt. 1st Class Jacob Braman

A two-man Green Beret sniper team emerged victorious at the elite U.S. Army Special Operations Command International Sniper Competition at the end of March, distinguishing themselves as among the most lethal sharpshooters in the special operations community.

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