An M1A1 Abrams tank from the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, Fort Irwin, Calif., thunders down the road during Torrance's 58th Annual Armed Forces Day Parade, May 20, 2017. (U.S. Army/Sgt. David Edge)

A Marine who posted on Facebook that people who objected to tanks being part of July 4th festivities in the nation's capital should kill themselves has been disciplined administratively, a Corps spokesman said.

In July, Chief Warrant Officer 2 Kevin Ennett responded to a message from the Marine Corps' official Facebook account wishing Marines a happy Independence Day with the following tirade: "Here's to any complaints about tanks and a [middle finger] to anyone who says anything about PTSD! Happy 4th. Blow your fingers off, get black out drunk, engage in risky behavior that offends snow flakes. If you die, then you didn't deserve to live! If you wine, hurry and become a '22' statistic today!"

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(Associated Press/Facebook/Photo illustration by Task & Purpose)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

An Illinois congressman in the Air National Guard is pressing Facebook's CEO Mark Zuckerberg to do more to stop "romance scams," especially since many U.S. service members have become targets of the illicit activity.

In a letter sent to Zuckerberg Wednesday, Rep. Adam Kinzinger, a Republican, said he is "increasingly concerned" by these scams — where Internet users anywhere in the world claim to be veterans and exploit victims for money — that are consistently perpetuated on the social media platform. He asked Zuckerberg to better weed out fake accounts and improve security of the site to that end.

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(Shit My LPO says 4)

If it looks too good to be true, chances are it probably is.

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The Army has been taking "new year, new me" to the next level.

There seems to be a massive rebrand underway; In addition to the Army bringing back it's snazzy-as-hell Army Greens, they're developing new commercials and a new GoArmy website, according to Col. John Oliver, the Army Marketing & Research Group's deputy director.

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Indian pilot Wing Commander Abhinandan captured by Pakistan is seen in this handout photo released February 27, 2019. (Inter Service Public Relation (ISPR) Handout via Reuters)

ISLAMABAD/NEW DELHI (Reuters) - A downed Indian fighter pilot who was attacked by a mob and then paraded on video by Pakistan's army has become a social media sensation and a hero in his homeland amid a spiraling crisis between the nuclear-armed neighbors.

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US Army soldier takes a selfie during a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter flight over the Black Sea. (U.S. Army/William B. King)

Enemies can use social media to not only inexpensively find and target NATO forces — but also manipulate them, new research has concluded.

Researchers with NATO's Strategic Communications Center of Excellence used open source data, primarily social media, to successfully identify 150 soldiers, locate multiple battalions, track troop movements, and even convince service members to leave their posts and engage in other "undesirable behavior" during a military exercise, Wired reported Monday, citing a StratCom report.

And they did it for only $60, demonstrating how easy it is for an aggressor to target NATO with data available online.

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