U.S. Army/Spc. Hubert Delany III

As if having a loved one deployed overseas isn't enough, family members of soldiers deployed with the 82nd Airborne Division are being warned of "menacing" messages they might receive on social media, and are being encouraged to report any they see.

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A Marine uses a cellphone in the field in 2016. (U.S. Marine Corps/Lance Cpl. David Staten)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

A junior Marine got his artillery unit into a serious bind after snapping a photo during a massive force-on-force training exercise in California's Mojave Desert.

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A trainee from Fort Jackson smiles as she speaks to loved ones over her cell phone while waiting for transportation to the Columbia, S.C. Amtrak station Dec. 18 at the Joe E. Mann Center on Fort Jackson. (U.S. Army/ Robert Timmons)

Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox and Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

As America's adversaries become more sophisticated, U.S. combat troops heading to the war zone may have to get used to leaving behind their phones, laptops and even personal gaming devices, military experts say.

The Pentagon doesn't have a blanket policy barring service members from taking electronic devices on deployment, but combat commanders are beginning to prohibit them when going into the unknown.

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Chineses social media app TikTok (Reuters photo)

Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The U.S. Army has reversed its policy on TikTok, Military.com has learned, banning soldiers from using the popular Chinese social media app, which is now considered a security threat.

"It is considered a cyber threat," Lt. Col. Robin Ochoa, an Army spokeswoman, told Military.com. "We do not allow it on government phones."

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks with Marine Jason Perkins after he sang the National Anthem during a campaign stop Saturday, Nov. 21, 2015 in Birmingham, Ala. (AP Photo/Eric Schultz)

Editor's note: This article by Hope Hodge Seck originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

As a final, intensive year of campaigning begins ahead of the 2020 presidential election, the Marine Corps has issued a new message to troops making clear what's off-limits to them in terms of political activity -- particularly on social media.

The message, released this month, reiterates past guidance: Marines can vote and verbally express political opinions, but cannot use their uniform to suggest military endorsement. But it expands on historically grey areas that have gotten troops into trouble.

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Army cadets have been instructed not to use the TikTok social media app while in uniform, an Army official told Task & Purpose on Thursday.

Maj. Gen. John Evans, head of U.S. Army Cadet Command, "directed all ROTC and JROTC units verify that the TikTok application was not being used for official purposes," Lt. Col. Nichole Downs, a spokeswoman, said in a statement. "No guidance was issued regarding Cadets' private use of TikTok."

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