A formation of U.S. Army soldiers with III Corps and Fort Hood honor the American flag as they lower it during the Retreat ceremony March 27, 2014. Retreat is conducted at the end of the day, every day, to honor the flag, which is raised during the Reveille ceremony each morning. All activity on the base stops for the duration of both ceremonies as soldiers pause, face the flag, and salute. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar, 7th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment) (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ken Scar)

The Army has released the name of a soldier who died last week at Fort Hood.

Pfc. Mason Webber, 22, from Marion, Iowa, died from injuries sustained while he was conducting maintenance on a Bradley Fighting Vehicle, according to a press statement released Monday.

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The Pentagon has identified a soldier killed in a car bombing in Afghanistan on Thursday as Sgt. 1st Class Elis A. Barreto Ortiz.

Barreto, 34, from Morovis, Puerto Rico, was killed in a blast from a car bomb that was detonated close to his vehicle near the U.S. Embassy in Kabul.

Barreto was serving with Company H, 82nd Brigade Support Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division out of Fort Bragg, North Carolina as a maintenance control sergeant.

"With honor and courage, Sgt. 1st Class Barreto answered our nation's call to deploy and serve in Afghanistan," Col. Arthur Sellers, commander of the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, said in a statement. "In this most difficult time, his loved ones are now surrounded by a community of love and caring by members of our Paratrooper Family Readiness Group."

The Taliban claimed responsibility for the bombing, which also killed a Romanian soldier and 10 civilians. More than 40 others were wounded. The incident is under investigation, a Pentagon news release said.

Barreto, who leaves behind a wife and children in Cameron, North Carolina, first joined the Army in 2010.

His awards and decorations include the Purple Heart, the Bronze Star Medal, the Meritorius Service Medal, the Army Commendation Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters, the Army Achievement Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters, the Army Good Conduct Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters, the Combat Action Badge, the Basic Parachutist Badge, the Army Driver and Mechanic Badge, according to a release from the 82nd Airborne Division.

Barreto is the 19th U.S. service member to be killed in Afghanistan in 2019.

Photo: Lee County Sheriff's Office/Facebook

An Alabama woman was charged in the shooting death of her husband, an Army sergeant stationed at Fort Benning, just days after he filed for a restraining order against her.

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Photo illustration by Paul Szoldra/Task & Purpose

Fifteen pounds.

That seems to be what separates a high-performing Marine from eventually becoming a combat casualty, according to new research carried out by a Marine captain at the Naval Postgraduate School.

In her award-winning master's thesis, titled Paying For Weight In Blood: An Analysis of Weight and Protection Level of a Combat Load During Tactical Operations, Capt. Courtney Thompson argues that being able to move faster is more important against near-peer enemies in combat, and the all-too-common trend of burdening troops with heavier loads can lead to an increase in casualties.

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Col. Gregory Townsend, incoming commander, accepts the organizational colors from Brig. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg, Quartermaster General, during the 23rd Quartermaster Brigade Change of Command Ceremony July 28 at Seay Field. (Photo: Terrance Bell)

Army Col. Gregory S. Townsend died Monday from injuries he sustained while trying to help a Virginia motorist change a tire, according to Army officials at Fort Lee.

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Photo: Army Staff Sgt. Terrance Payton

Capt. Jacob Riffe was traveling on Interstate 95 last April when he noticed a vehicle swerve and crash into a fence.

Riffe, a soldier with the 264th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 3rd Expeditionary Sustainment Command, said his training kicked in as he pulled his vehicle over and rushed to help the occupants.

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