The death of a Fort Bragg soldier is currently under investigation, officials said.

Sgt. Matthew D. Joskowitz, 24, of Hackensack, New Jersey, died on Fort Bragg at about 9 p.m. Thursday in a non-training related incident, officials said.

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Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy really doesn't want you to know how swole he is, as the former Army ranger refused to answer repeated questions from Task & Purpose about what he scored on the Army Combat Fitness Test.

"I'm not going to tell you," McCarthy said at the Military Reporters and Editors' annual conference in Arlington, Va. on Friday (Oct. 25). McCarthy said he passed the ACFT over a year ago in order to understand the experience.

"I'm a 46-year-old man that rides a desk every day and I got through it," said McCarthy, who described himself as a regular swimmer at the Pentagon pool. "It can be done, you gotta train for it and take care of your body. It's not just working out, it's eating right and sleeping. So I do well on one of those three: working out."

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(U.S. Army/Sgt. LaShic Patterson)

How We Found Out explores recent reporting from Task & Purpose, answering questions about how we sourced our stories, what challenges we faced, and offers a behind-the-scenes look at how we cover issues impacting the military and veterans community.

Over the last two weeks Task & Purpose has published several stories based on the Army's annual Crime Report for 2018. The expansive report yielded articles on: 10 'known or suspected terrorists' who tried to access Army bases in 2018; and that hundreds of soldiers were able to rejoin the service after being kicked out for 'adverse reasons'; and then there was the soldier who stole a 155mm artillery round during training and nobody noticed for six years.

On Oct. 15, Task & Purpose published its latest piece from the report, which found that marijuana use has shot up in states where weed is legal.

The internal document was provided to Task & Purpose's editor in chief, Paul Szoldra, and given that it offered insight into how the Army tracked and assessed crime in the service in 2018, senior reporter James Clark, spoke with Szoldra to ask how the stories were selected, what additional sourcing was necessary, and how we, as a news team, approach leaked documents.

This is the second installment in the recurring column How We Found Out.

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The U.S. Army allowed hundreds of soldiers to rejoin the service after being separated for "adverse reasons," according to an internal document obtained by Task & Purpose.

"This latter population confirms previously identified gaps in the Army transition processes by allowing offenders to depart active duty with an inappropriate characterization of service and with a reentry code allowing them to reenter the Army," notes the Army Crime Report for Fiscal Year 2018, a non-public document published in Sept. that highlights criminal activity in the service and gives commanders' tips on how to address it.

"Commanders should note that administratively separating soldiers titled with egregious felony-level offenses, without conviction by general or special courts-martials, may result in the lack of a criminal record of these soldiers' actions in Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) criminal databases," the report says, using the word titled, which, according to an Army legal guide, is a law enforcement term for a soldier being named as the subject of an investigation.

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A formation of U.S. Army soldiers with III Corps and Fort Hood honor the American flag as they lower it during the Retreat ceremony March 27, 2014. Retreat is conducted at the end of the day, every day, to honor the flag, which is raised during the Reveille ceremony each morning. All activity on the base stops for the duration of both ceremonies as soldiers pause, face the flag, and salute. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar, 7th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment) (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ken Scar)

The Army has released the name of a soldier who died last week at Fort Hood.

Pfc. Mason Webber, 22, from Marion, Iowa, died from injuries sustained while he was conducting maintenance on a Bradley Fighting Vehicle, according to a press statement released Monday.

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The Pentagon has identified a soldier killed in a car bombing in Afghanistan on Thursday as Sgt. 1st Class Elis A. Barreto Ortiz.

Barreto, 34, from Morovis, Puerto Rico, was killed in a blast from a car bomb that was detonated close to his vehicle near the U.S. Embassy in Kabul.

Barreto was serving with Company H, 82nd Brigade Support Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division out of Fort Bragg, North Carolina as a maintenance control sergeant.

"With honor and courage, Sgt. 1st Class Barreto answered our nation's call to deploy and serve in Afghanistan," Col. Arthur Sellers, commander of the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, said in a statement. "In this most difficult time, his loved ones are now surrounded by a community of love and caring by members of our Paratrooper Family Readiness Group."

The Taliban claimed responsibility for the bombing, which also killed a Romanian soldier and 10 civilians. More than 40 others were wounded. The incident is under investigation, a Pentagon news release said.

Barreto, who leaves behind a wife and children in Cameron, North Carolina, first joined the Army in 2010.

His awards and decorations include the Purple Heart, the Bronze Star Medal, the Meritorius Service Medal, the Army Commendation Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters, the Army Achievement Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters, the Army Good Conduct Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters, the Combat Action Badge, the Basic Parachutist Badge, the Army Driver and Mechanic Badge, according to a release from the 82nd Airborne Division.

Barreto is the 19th U.S. service member to be killed in Afghanistan in 2019.

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