South Korean army Sergeant Byun Hui-su weeps during a press conference at the Center for Military Human Right Korea in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020. South Korea's military decided Wednesday to discharge Byun who recently undertook gender reassignment surgery, a ruling expected to draw strong criticism from human rights groups. (Associated Press/Ahn Young-joon)

SEOUL (Reuters) - South Korea's first transgender soldier said on Wednesday she would sue the military after it announced it would dismiss her for undergoing gender reassignment surgery last year.

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Republic of Korea Special Warfare Command service members provide security coverage from an observation point during a training event at Kunsan Air Force Base, South Korea, Nov. 12, 2019. (U.S. Air Force photo/Capt. David J. Murphy)

SEOUL (Reuters) - South Korea's military said on Thursday it will hold a meeting to discuss whether it will discharge the first soldier to have undergone gender reassignment surgery, which has sparked national debate about the treatment of LGBT troops.

The soldier, who holds the rank of staff sergeant and is stationed in Gyeonggi Province, north of Seoul, received the operation overseas last year while on leave, and expressed hope to continue serving in the female corps, an army official said.

The military has not identified the soldier. The official said the soldier was at a military hospital receiving post-surgery treatment.

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Retired Army Lt. Col. Patrick Schreiber stands beside his adopted daughter Hyebin and wife Soo Jin. (Courtesy photo)

Hyebin Schreiber is getting ready to leave the country she loves — the one her father, a retired lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army, fought for for 27 years.

The 22-year-old from Lansing, Kan., doesn't want to self-deport. Adopted from troubled relatives in South Korea in 2014, she now possesses a legal Kansas birth certificate.

This is her home.

But for five years, she and her parents, Lt. Col. Patrick Schreiber and his wife, Soo Jin Schreiber, have been in pitched court battles with the U.S. government, which claims that as the result of a regrettable immigration SNAFU, the young woman must go back to South Korea.

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Republic of Korea Special Warfare Command service members provide security coverage from an observation point during a training event at Kunsan Air Force Base, South Korea, Nov. 12, 2019. (U.S. Air Force/Capt. David J. Murphy)

SEOUL (Reuters) - South Korean and U.S. special operations forces recently conducted drills simulating the infiltration of an enemy facility, U.S. military photos seen by Reuters on Monday show, as tensions with North Korea ratchet up ahead of a year-end deadline.

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A South Korean soldier watches a TV showing a file footage for a news report on North Korea firing a missile that is believed to be launched from a submarine, in Seoul, South Korea, October 2, 2019. (REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji)

SEOUL (Reuters) - A last minute flurry of diplomacy aimed at engaging with North Korea ahead of its declared year-end deadline for talks has been met with stony silence from Pyongyang so far, with the looming crisis expected to top the agenda at summits in China next week.

The U.S. special envoy for North Korea, Stephen Biegun, was due to leave Beijing on Friday after meeting with Chinese officials. Earlier in the week, Biegun also made stops in Seoul and Tokyo for discussions with counterparts.

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Photo: 2nd Combat Aviation Brigade

Troops in South Korea can expect late nights from here on out, because the U.S. Forces Korea commander says the curfew is officially over.

Giphy

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