Staff Sgt. Logan Melgar (U.S. Army photo)

A Navy SEAL and Marine Raider charged with murder in connection with the death of Special Forces Staff Sgt. Logan Melgar will face a general court-martial this spring, the Navy has announced.

The trial for Navy Chief Special Warfare Operator Tony E. Dedolph, who is accused of placing Melgar in a chokehold until he died, is expected to last from March 23 to April 3, according to Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. Marine Gunnery Sgt. Mario A. Madero-Rodriguez's court-martial is slated to last from April 20 until May 1.

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Retired Brig. Gen. Jim Mackey presents the Distinguished Flying Cross with Valor citation to Lt. Col. Anthony Roe, a flight commander with the 303d Fighter Squadron, during a ceremony at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo., Nov. 2, 2019 (U.S. Air Force/Airman 1st Class Alex Chase)

The A-10 Warthog and its brave pilots solidified their reputation as the infantry's guardian angels earlier this month when two Missouri-based airmen received one of the military's most prestigious medals for their role in saving dozens of grunts, engineers and special forces under heavy fire in Afghanistan.

The Distinguished Flying Cross is rarely awarded, let alone awarded twice on the same day to two members of the same fighter squadron, Lt. Col. Rick Mitchell, commander of the 303rd Fighter Squadron, told more than 200 onlookers at the ceremony at Whiteman Air Force Base on Nov. 2.

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Maj. Matthew Golsteyn in Afghanistan. (Photo courtesy of Philip Stackhouse.)

Maj. Matthew Golstyen has formally asked the Army to restore his Distinguished Service Cross, which he was awarded but never received, said his attorney Phillip Stackhouse.

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Maj. Matthew Golsteyn in Afghanistan. (Photo courtesy of Philip Stackhouse.)

President Donald Trump has ended the decade-long saga of Maj. Matthew Golsteyn by ordering a murder charge against the former Green Beret dismissed with a full pardon.

The Army charged Golsteyn with murder in December 2018 after he repeatedly acknowledged that he killed an unarmed Afghan man in 2010. Golsteyn's charge sheet identifies the man as "Rasoul."

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Maj. Matthew Golsteyn in Afghanistan. (Photo courtesy of Philip Stackhouse.)

The court-martial for Army Maj. Matthew Golsteyn, who is charged with murder after he admitted to killing an unarmed Afghan man whom a trial elder had identified as a Taliban bomb maker, has been delayed until February, the Army confirmed.

Glosteyn's trial was supposed to begin on Dec. 2 but is now slated to start on Feb. 19, said Lt. Col. Loren Bymer, a spokesman for U.S. Army Special Operations Command.

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(Reuters) - In the summer of 2004, U.S. soldier Greg Walker drove to a checkpoint just outside of Baghdad's Green Zone with his Kurdish bodyguard, Azaz. When he stepped out of his SUV, three Iraqi guards turned him around at gunpoint.

As he walked back to the vehicle, he heard an AK-47 being racked and a hail of cursing in Arabic and Kurdish. He turned to see Azaz facing off with the Iraqis.

"Let us through or I'll kill you all," Walker recalled his Kurdish bodyguard telling the Iraqi soldiers, who he described as "terrified."

He thought to himself: "This is the kind of ally and friend I want."

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