Editor's note: A version of this article previously ran on Oct. 28, 2016

It's late October, and that means it's time to figure out what you're going to "be" for Halloween this year.

Of course, you could always just go with the obvious — you could dress up as a vampire, or a zombie, or that chubby bald fella who wore a red sweater to the second presidential debate (can't think of his name). But that's boring. If you really want to be the life of the party, you should probably opt for something more original — something with a little bit more pizazz.

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Editor's note: A version of this article previously ran on Oct. 28, 2016

Stepping into BDUs and pinning a bunch of valor medals on your chest when you haven't earned them is fucked up, and some states have even tried to make it punishable by fine and prison time.

But Halloween is one out of 365 days where this shouldn't be an issue. It's the only time of year where civilians like me should be able to put on a flight suit and feel like "Top Gun" to escape the sad reality of sitting behind a computer screen for 16 hours a day.

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Editor's Note: This article by Hope Hodge Seck originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

In the wake of a heartwarming viral video that was featured everywhere from Good Morning America to the Daily Mail comes a disheartening revelation: The 84-year-old self-described Army nurse cranking out push-ups in her crisp Vietnam-era uniform might not be who she said she was.

Maggie DeSanti, allegedly a retired Army lieutenant colonel who rappeled out of helicopters in Vietnam, was captured in a video challenging a TSA agent to a push-up competition ahead of a flight to Washington, D.C., with the Arizona chapter of the organization Honor Flight on Oct. 16. The video soon was everywhere, and many who shared it, including Honor Flight, hailed DeSanti's toughness and spirit.

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Ernest Hemingway wields a tommy gun aboard his boat, circa 1935. (Wikimedia Commons photo)

Long before Ernest Hemingway wrote, drank and fought his way into the ranks of America's legendary wordsmiths, the beloved author cut his literary teeth on the beat of a Canadian newspaper.

Fresh off a stint driving an ambulance for the Red Cross on the Italian front during World War I, the young Hemingway landed at The Toronto Star Weekly in early 1920, where he covered everything from mobsters to the complete uselessness of wedding gifts — including the rise of stolen valor and the lousy market for war medals that accompanied the end of the Great War.

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State Rep. Anthony Sabatini is pushing for expansion of the state's stolen valor law, making false claims of military service or awards for political and professional gain a third-degree felony.

Sabatini, the Lake County Republican, said he co-sponsored fellow Republican Bryan Avila's bill in part because of controversy in Groveland several years ago when mayoral candidate George Rosario embellished his military accomplishments as he mounted a run for office.

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Talk about a punishment that fits the crime: a pair of Montana men who lied about serving in military to get their cases to a state veterans court ended up getting an extra lesson in respect for the U.S. armed forces.

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