Companies make a big stink out of their efforts to employ U.S. service members who are transitioning out of military service, but veterans still face a major obstacle when it comes to the actual hiring process: they're seen as unemotional, unfeeling, and lacking in interpersonal skills — and that screws them over when it come to certain jobs.

New research from Duke University's Fuqua School of Business, based on experiments involving more than 3,000 participants and published in the journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Process, indicates that veteran job candidates are widely seen as possessing a "calm under pressure and having a get-it-done kind of attitude," according to lead researcher
Aaron Kay.

But while those traits are normally appealing, Kay said that the changing nature of the U.S. economy means that many new jobs "many new types of jobs also require creativity, interpersonal skills and emotional capacity" — traits that civilians assume military veterans fundamentally lack.

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U.S. Coast Guard Academy Class of 2016 graduates celebrate during their commencement ceremony in New London, Conn., May 18, 2016. (U.S. Coast Guard/Petty Officer 2nd Class Cory J. Mendenhall)

The Coast Guard Academy, which is involved in the most comprehensive concussion study to date, is preparing to track cadets after they leave the academy to examine the impact a concussion can have on a person's brain over time.

The study, launched in 2014 by the NCAA and the Department of Defense, initially looked at the impacts from concussions or repeated head injuries in the hours, days and weeks after the injury, and compared those to assessments done beforehand. Now, it is expanding the study to look at potential cumulative effects.

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Sgt. Ryan Blount, 27th Brigade, New York Army National Guard, rests in a hallway after a full day of field training, before heading back out Jan. 16, 2015, at Alexandria International Airport, La. (U.S. Air Force/Senior Airman Cliffton Dolezal)

(Reuters Health) - Soldiers who experience sleep problems during basic combat training may be more likely to struggle with psychological distress, attention difficulties, and anger issues during their entry into the military, a recent study suggests.

"These results show that it would probably be useful to check in with new soldiers over time because sleep problems can be a signal that a soldier is encountering difficulties," said Amanda Adrian, lead author of the study and a research psychologist at the Center for Military Psychiatry and Neuroscience at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in Silver Spring, Maryland.

"Addressing sleep problems early on should help set soldiers up for success as they transition into their next unit of assignment," she said by email.

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(U.S. Army/ Sgt. Shawn Miller)

(Reuters Health) - U.S. soldiers are more likely to have poor heart health than civilians of similar ages, a new study finds.

Comparing more than 263,000 active duty Army personnel to nearly 5,000 civilians, researchers found that soldiers were more likely to have high blood pressure and just as likely to have a higher than ideal body mass index (BMI), according to the report in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

"We were surprised by the results," said lead author Loryana Vie, senior project director of a long-term collaboration between the U.S. Army and the University of Pennsylvania. "They were contrary to what we were expecting going into the study because of the Army's health screening and emphasis on physical fitness."

Ultimately, Vie said, the take-home message isn't just that soldiers have worse heart health than civilians, but rather that there is "so much room for improvement for everyone," she said. "There is an opportunity to improve the health of the whole country."

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