Federal prosecutors Thursday charged a Long Island company, its chief executive and other employees with fraudulently passing off Chinese-made surveillance and security equipment as American-made and selling it to the U.S. government — potentially exposing the military and federal agencies to cybersecurity surveillance and attack.

Commack-based Aventura Technologies Inc., and seven of its current and former employees, ran the scheme that dated to 2006, netting some $88 million in sales, including $20 million in government contracts in the last nine years, authorities said.

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Remote Combat Effects Campaign Medal (U.S. Air Force graphic by Staff Sgt. Sahara Fales)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The U.S. Air Force says airmen serving in cyber; space; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; and remotely piloted aircraft jobs may be eligible to receive the newly created Remote Combat Effects Campaign Medal if they were part of operations that had significant impact.

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(New Line Cinema)

The Marine Corps has tapped a new Silicon Valley defense firm to develop a "digital fortress" of networked surveillance systems in order to enhance the situational awareness of security forces at installations around the world.

Marine Corps Installations Command on July 15 announced a $13.5 million sole source contract award to Anduril Industries — the two-year-old defense technology company and Project Maven contractor founded by Oculus VR founder Palmer Luckey and several former Palantir Technologies executives — for a new Autonomous Surveillance Counter Intrusion Capability (ASCIC) designed to help secure installations against "all manners of intrusion" without additional manpower.

This is no standard intrusion system. Through its AI-driven Lattice Platform network and 32-foot-tall autonomous Sentry Towers, Anduril purports to combine the virtual reality systems that Luckey pioneered at Oculus with Pentagon's most advanced sensors into a simple mobile platform, enhancing an installation's surveillance capabilities with what Wired recently dubbed "a web of all-seeing eyes, with intelligence to know what it sees."

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A Russian Air Force Tupolev Tu-154B2 in 2008. (Wikimedia Commons/Kirill Naumenko)

A Russian surveillance jet based out of Travis Air Force Base in northern California has been enjoying access to restricted air space that are off limits to U.S. passenger planes since last week.

In turn, Russia has allowed U.S. spy planes to fly over its nation's most sensitive military bases.

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Photo: FLIR Systems, Inc.

A drone that can fit in the palm of a soldier's hand will be flying with Army infantrymen sometime later this year.

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U.S. Army photo

First, there were stealth fighters that didn’t show up on radar. Now the Army wants uniforms that allow ground troops to escape the notice of electromagnetic eyes.

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