CAIRO (Reuters) - Islamic State's media network on Monday issued an audio message purporting to come from its leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi saying operations were taking place daily and urging freedom for women jailed in Iraq and Syria over their alleged links to the group.

"Daily operations are underway on different fronts," he said in the 30-minute tape published by the Al Furqan network, in what would be his first message since April. He cited several regions such as Mali and the Levant but gave no dates.

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The American-born ISIS member recently captured by a Kurdish militia has bizarrely claimed that the brutal executions carried out by the terrorist group were basically the same thing as what they do back in his home state of Texas.

"I think, with the beheadings, okay that's execution," Warren Christopher Clark told NBC News' Richard Engel during a recent interview in Syria. "I'm from the United States, from Texas. They like to execute people too. So I really don't see any different. Maybe they might do it off camera, but it's the same."

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Fox News/screenshot

Terrorists are coming across the border! We've caught 4,000 of them! Al Qaeda is infiltrating through Mexico so we absolutely need this wall. 9/11! National security issue!

If any of these tropes sound familiar, you've probably heard something like it from President Donald Trump, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, the Department of Homeland Security, of name-your-talking-head on AM radio.

But a segment on Fox News Sunday with Chris Wallace really drove home that this talking point is total bullshit, while showing White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders twisting herself into pretzels trying to make the statistics fit the administration's dubious narrative.

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Rex Features via AP Images

Authorities in the United Kingdom have arrested four active-duty soldiers in the British Army for their alleged connections to a Nazi front group suspected of “the commission, preparation and instigation” of terrorist acts, the Associated Press reported Sep. 5. The move comes at the end of a summer in which the U.S. was so roiled by far-right racist groups — some of whose members had military connections — that the chiefs of all the service branches came out publicly to renounce extremism.

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