The Armed Forces Service Medal has a green, blue and yellow ribbon and a bronze medal featuring a torch like that held by the Statue of Liberty. (U.S. Air Force/Staff Sgt. Alexx Pons)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Thousands of U.S. service members who've been sent to operate along the Mexico border will receive a military award reserved for troops who "encounter no foreign armed opposition or imminent hostile action."

The Pentagon has authorized troops who have deployed to the border to assist U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) since last April to receive the Armed Forces Service Medal. Details about the decision were included in a Marine Corps administrative message in response to authorization from the Defense Department.

There is no end date for the award since the operation remains ongoing.

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(U.S. Mashalls Service)

DALLAS, Tex. -- A North Texas militia member and convicted felon who led armed patrols of the Texas-Mexico border has gone into hiding after being released from prison on federal weapons charges.

Officials warn that Kevin Lyndel Massey's recent vows to wage war against the federal government make him a dangerous threat.

U.S. Marshals are searching for Massey, 53, who lived most recently in Quinlan, less than an hour east of Dallas. Federal authorities say Massey, who espouses anti-government rhetoric, is known for his love of heavy weaponry as well as an "alarming rage."

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(Associated Press/Hans-Maximo Musielik)

The Trump administration plans on housing around 1,400 unaccompanied migrant children detained at the U.S.-Mexico border at Fort Sill in Oklahoma, officials announced on Tuesday.

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President Donald Trump said on Wednesday that to send additional U.S. troops to the southwestern border with Mexico — and he indicated he wants service members to do more than just build physical barriers.

"I'm going to have to call up more military," Trump told reporters in Texas. "Our military – don't forget – can't act like a military would act. Because if they got a little rough, everybody would go crazy."

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Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Robert B. Neller speaks to Marines and guests during the Semper Fidelis Society of Boston Luncheon at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center, Nov. 12, 2018. Gen. Neller was the guest of honor and guest speaker. (U.S. Marine Corps/Sgt. Olivia G. Ortiz)

Deploying troops to the U.S.-Mexico hasn't hurt Marine Corps readiness as much as previously reported, Commandant Gen. Robert Neller told lawmakers on Tuesday, directly contradicting the "unacceptable risk" to readiness the Corps' top officer had explicitly detailed in a pair of internal memos that leaked last month.

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