Oh, the 1940s, the glory days of military training videos: Back when PME's were produced with a Hollywood director's panache, and a cast of leading men were brought in to break down fourth walls with a devilish wink and a nod to the camera before dispensing some sage advice, like how to crack a tank.

While not every pearl of wisdom from retro military training videos withstands the test of time — see the Navy's 1967 video: How To Succeed With Brunettes — a recently resurfaced clip from a 1943 training video starring Burgess Meredith of Rocky fame seems to stand up in a few parts, but not all (more on that later.)

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Lt. Thomas "Jimmy" Crotty (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

The commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard intends to be in Buffalo, New York for Saturday's funeral Mass and burial of Lt. Thomas "Jimmy" Crotty, a World War II legend whose remains are expected to return this week to his hometown.

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The poster for 'Midway'

LONDON (Reuters) - Twenty years after first toying with the idea, German film director Roland Emmerich brings his World War II drama Midway to cinemas next month, focusing on the 1942 Battle of Midway.

Known for big-budget disaster movies filled with special effects like Independence Day and Godzilla, Emmerich long wanted to recount the giant air and sea battle in the Pacific during which U.S. forces defeated an attacking Japanese fleet.

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Emmett William Chappelle Sr., a retired NASA scientist who studied luminescence and once recruited children to collect fireflies for his research, died of renal failure Oct. 14 at his home in the Garwyn Oaks section of West Baltimore. He was 93.

Born in Phoenix, Arizona, he was the son of Isom Chappelle, a farmer who raised cotton and cattle, and his wife, Viola. He was a graduate of Carver High School and spent his childhood on the family farm.

During World War II he joined the Army and served from 1942 to 1946 in the African American 92nd Infantry Division, also known as the Buffalo Soldiers Division. A mortar expert stationed in Italy, he was was wounded by shrapnel that struck his head. He received a Purple Heart.

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When the USS Corry, an American Navy destroyer bombarded by the Nazis, sank off the coast of Normandy on D-Day in 1944, its executive officer, the second-in-command, crowded as many rescued sailors as he could on a whaler used as a lifeboat. Then he saw a body floating close by.

He told his men to tie it to the side of the boat. There was no more room on board.

He didn't know whether the sailor was alive in the cold English Channel waters, but he felt compelled to pick him up.

The unconscious teenager tied to the lifeboat was Chet Furtek of Philadelphia. He awoke, with his face covered by a blanket, on a rescue ship. He thought he had died and gone to purgatory. Heaven, he knew, was out of reach. But he soon found himself alive, surrounded by other wounded and deceased sailors and soldiers being transported back to England as solemn music played from a loud speaker.

Furtek is now 93. And the story of his rescue, which he described as a miracle, has not been forgotten.

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More than 74 years after Marines raised the American flag on Mount Suribachi, Iwo Jima, the Marine Corps has announced that one of men in the most famous picture of World War II had been misidentified.

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