(U.S. Navy/Petty Officer 1st Class RJ Stratchko)

Editor's Note: This article by Amy Bushatz originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

All Department of Veterans Affairs health care facilities will be completely smoke-free by October, with all forms of tobacco use, including e-cigarettes and vaping, banned from facility grounds, officials announced in a news release Monday.

The policy change, first published by the Veterans Health Administration in early March, ends the use of designated smoking areas or shelters at VA hospitals.

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AP Photo/Mark Humphrey

With little attention, President Donald Trump’s administration has been quietly loosening firearms restrictions in the United States after successfully seeking the support of gun owners on the campaign trail.

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Photo via Flickr (M&R Glasgow)

On Nov. 14, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives modified Form 4473 — a piece of government paperwork required of anyone wishing to exercise his or her right to bear arms under the Second Amendment. One of the little tweaks involved a clarification of question 11e, the one that reads, “Are you an unlawful user of, or addicted to, marijuana or any depressant, stimulant, narcotic drug or any other controlled substance?

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A sailor is in federal custody this week on charges he tried to hire a hit man to kill his estranged wife.

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Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class James Stenberg

In early April, Secretary of Defense Ash Carter issued a memorandum with plans to limit tobacco use among service members. Specifically, the policy plans call for increasing the price of tobacco sold on military bases and widening smoke-free zones in areas frequented by children, according to Reuters, which saw the April 8 memo.

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