An unclassified 1,300-page “unvarnished history” of the Iraq War is at the center of a heated debate among Army leaders and historians over who gets credit for what, according to the Wall Street Journal.

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U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Brian Ferguson

Ten years ago next month, the U.S. military changed tack in a messy Iraq occupation, launching what’s simply known as “the surge.” Today, experts are still fighting over it. Even among those who credit Gen. David Petraeus and his counterinsurgency (COIN) strategy with turning the Iraq War around, there are competing theories on why it worked. Some have argued forcefully that it wasn’t the surplus of American troops or shift in tactics that put an end to the sectarian war that rocked Iraq in the months leading up to the surge, but rather that the war had simply bled itself out by the time we decided to get involved. Those who say it didn’t work at all can point to the subsequent rise of ISIS — whose leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, was reportedly radicalized while being held in a U.S. detention facility — and the fact that Baghdad is now firmly under Iranian control; here, they argue, is proof that the surge did little more than allow the U.S. to leave Iraq with its dignity intact.

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AP Images/Alex Brandon

After sending “the generals” scurrying for months to provide him with a strategy for victory in Afghanistan, President Donald Trump is considering another option this morning. Call it the Cartman Strategy: Screw you guys, I’m going home.

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Photo via DoD

The US military wasn't "necessarily concerned" about limiting civilian deaths during the 2007 troop surge in Iraq, according to the Army's top general overseeing logistics.

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Photo courtesy of Netflix

With the White House mulling a new troop surge in Afghanistan, “War Machine,” a dark comedy about the last time we tried this, is exactly what we need right now. On the surface, the feature-length film from writer-director David Michôd — streaming on Netflix starting today — is an examination of post-colonial hubris. Brad Pitt stars as an eerily familiar four-star general tasked with doing what no other foreign military leader could: winning in the storied Southwest Asian graveyard of empires.

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Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Lucas Hopkins

The Pentagon had previously announced plans to expand U.S. military operations in Afghanistan by at least several thousand additional troops, but future deployments to the country will apparently depend on the number of additional forces NATO is willing to commit to the 16-year effort to defeat the Taliban, Stars and Stripes reports.

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