The number of U.S. troops diagnosed with Traumatic Brain Injury following Iran's missile attack on Al- Asad Air Base in Iraq now stands at 50, the Defense Department announced on Tuesday.

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U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to reporters as he departs for travel to New Orleans, Louisiana from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S., (January 13, 2020. REUTERS/Leah Millis)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Trump administration violated federal law last year by withholding security aid for Ukraine that had been appropriated by Congress, a U.S. congressional watchdog said in a report released on Thursday.

"Faithful execution of the law does not permit the President to substitute his own policy priorities for those that Congress has enacted into law," the U.S. Government Accountability Office said, referring to the Office of Management and Budget.

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U.S. President Donald Trump holds a campaign rally in Toledo, Ohio, U.S., January 9, 2020. (REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump on Monday defended his decision to kill Iranian commander Qassem Soleimani, and said "it doesn't really matter" whether Soleimani posed an imminent threat to the United States.

"The Fake News Media and their Democrat Partners are working hard to determine whether or not the future attack by terrorist Soleimani was 'imminent' or not, & was my team in agreement," Trump wrote on Twitter.

"The answer to both is a strong YES., but it doesn't really matter because of his horrible past!"

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Elizabeth Warren (Associated Press photo)

Editor's note: Task & Purpose is determined to provide readers with the most detailed information possible about how the Democrats running for president would serve as commander in chief if elected.

While the candidates rarely talk about national security issues, we want to drill down on the specifics of how they would address the biggest challenges facing troops, veterans, and military families.

Below, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) answers questions from Pentagon correspondent Jeff Schogol about Iran, the F-35, and whether defense spending would conflict with her plans to expand entitlement programs, such as Medicare.

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U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper delivers a speech during a commemoration ceremony for the 75th anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge at the Mardasson World War II memorial monument in Bastogne, Belgium December 16, 2019. (Reuters/Francois Lenoir)

Defense Secretary Mark Esper struggled on Sunday to support President Donald Trump's claim that Maj. Gen. Qasem Soleimani was planning to attack four U.S. embassies when he was killed.

Speaking on CBS News, Esper told "Face the Nation" host Margaret Brennan that the president did not cite a specific piece of evidence that indicated Soleimani was plotting to attack the four embassies that Trump mentioned.

"Are you saying there wasn't one?" Brennan asked.

"I didn't see one with regard to four embassies," Esper replied. "What I'm saying is I share the president's view that, probably, my expectation was they were going to go after our embassies."

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