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An upcoming comedy show is boldly mocking what everyone else is, well, already mocking: The Space Force.

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Airmen assigned to the 779th Expeditionary Airlift Squadron conduct cargo operations along the coast of the Arabian Gulf, Dec. 24, 2019. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Michael Mason)

DUBAI (Reuters) - Kuwait's government said on Wednesday state news agency KUNA had been hacked and this had resulted in an incorrect report being issued saying U.S. military forces in Kuwait would be withdrawn imminently.

Tareq al-Muzarem, head of Kuwait's government communication office, announced the hacking of KUNA in a statement on an official Twitter account.

KUNA said the incorrect U.S. troop withdrawal report, which appeared on KUNA's Twitter feed, did not originate from the agency and was the result of a hacking. It did not say who might be to blame.

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U.S. Senator Rick Scott speaks during a press conference at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, April 29, 2019. (U.S. Air Force/Airman 1st Class Monica Roybal)

The Saudi national who killed three students on a U.S. Naval Air station in Pensacola was in the United States on a training exchange program.

On Sunday, Sen. Rick Scott said the United States should suspend that program, which brings foreign nationals to America for military training, pending a "full review."

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Two former employees of Twitter and a third man from Saudi Arabia face U.S. charges of spying for the kingdom by digging up private user data and giving it to Saudi officials in exchange for payment, according to a complaint filed on Wednesday.

Ali Alzabarah and Ahmad Abouammo, who used to work for Twitter, and Ahmed Almutairi, who then worked for the Saudi royal family, face charges of working for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia without registering as foreign agents, according to a complaint filed against them.

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Army Brig. Gen. Patrick Donahoe isn't like other generals. At least not in the way you'd think.

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Editor's Note: The following is an op-ed. The opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Task & Purpose.

Fifty years ago this month, a small Pentagon project designed to allow scientists to share time on the early versions of computers changed the world. The first links of what originally called "ARPANET" moved us all into the Internet Age, changing everything from business, dating, to daily reads.

Along the way, though, the Internet also became a new kind of battlefield. Nations, organizations, and even individuals are now hacking not just the networks themselves (a.k.a. "cyberwar," where the object is to breach a network), but also increasingly the people on them (what can be thought of as "likewar," where the object is to drive something viral through a mix of likes, shares, and sometimes lies).

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