The U.S. Army allowed hundreds of soldiers to rejoin the service after being separated for "adverse reasons," according to an internal document obtained by Task & Purpose.

"This latter population confirms previously identified gaps in the Army transition processes by allowing offenders to depart active duty with an inappropriate characterization of service and with a reentry code allowing them to reenter the Army," notes the Army Crime Report for Fiscal Year 2018, a non-public document published in Sept. that highlights criminal activity in the service and gives commanders' tips on how to address it.

"Commanders should note that administratively separating soldiers titled with egregious felony-level offenses, without conviction by general or special courts-martials, may result in the lack of a criminal record of these soldiers' actions in Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) criminal databases," the report says, using the word titled, which, according to an Army legal guide, is a law enforcement term for a soldier being named as the subject of an investigation.

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Photo: Paul Szoldra/Task & Purpose

SAN DIEGO (Reuters) - Closing arguments were due in San Diego on Monday in the war crimes trial of a decorated U.S. Navy SEAL platoon leader charged with murdering a helpless Iraqi captive in his custody and shooting unarmed civilians.

The court-martial of Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher neared the conclusion of its trial phase after a bumpy two weeks of testimony for Navy prosecutors in a case that has drawn the attention of U.S. President Donald Trump.

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Two soldiers with the 18th Military Police Brigade, 21st Theater Sustainment Command in Germany were recently punished after they catfished a fellow soldier and shared the soldier's nude photographs with others in their unit

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Maj. Matthew Golsteyn in Afghanistan. (Photo courtesy of Philip Stackhouse.)

Army Special Forces Maj. Matthew Golsteyn – whom President Donald Trump has called "a U.S. Military hero" – will face an Article 32 hearing in March after being charged with murder for allegedly killing a suspected Taliban bomb-maker.

On Dec. 18, the convening authority for Golestyn's case decided to hold the preliminary hearing in connection with the Feb. 28, 2010 incident, Army officials have announced. The proceedings are slated to start on March 14 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

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Domestic violence, recruiters having sex with recruits and committing adultery with someone of the same sex are now crimes in the military.

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U.S. Navy commanders will no longer be able to punish sailors and Marines with the infamous bread and water punishment while sitting in the ship's brig.

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