The iconic "Loose Lips Sink Ships" poster of World War II fame (Public domain_)

They used to say, "Loose lips sink ships," and Elizabeth "Betty" Petrie still lives by those words.

A lieutenant junior grade in the U.S. Navy women's auxiliary, Petrie worked in highly classified military communications during World War II, and Tuesday on the occasion of her 104th birthday, she still wouldn't breathe a word about the details of her work.

"I can't tell you anything," Petrie said, raising her hands, smiling.

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Nothing will make your heart soar like hearing the "The Star-Spangled Banner" ring out at a sporting event, so when 46 living Medal of Honor recipients descended upon the Amalie Arena in Tampa, Florida for a puck drop at a recent hockey game, we're guessing it probably felt a million bald eagles screaming "America!" all at once.

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More than 74 years after Marines raised the American flag on Mount Suribachi, Iwo Jima, the Marine Corps has announced that one of men in the most famous picture of World War II had been misidentified.

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Byron Fuller (Courtesy photo via Florida Times-Union)

Navy pilot Byron Fuller spent almost six years as a prisoner of war in North Vietnam, where his battered body was tortured and starved, where he endured more than two years in solitary confinement in a 4-by-7-foot cell.

Upon his release in 1973 from Hoa Lo, a prison camp known to the world as the Hanoi Hilton, he strode across the tarmac at Jacksonville Naval Air Station, a huge smile on his face, with his wife and four children by his side. He briefly addressed the crowd gathered to greet him: "America, America, how beautiful you are ... Tonight my cup runneth over."

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This is what it sounds like when more than 156,000 enormous pairs of balls roll up on a French beach ready to kick some Nazi ass.

During the D-Day landings at Normandy on June 6, 1944, radio correspondent George Hicks recorded 13 minutes of audio on a Recordgraph tape recording system that viscerally captured the unbridled death and destruction of the largest amphibious landing in the history of warfare.

And while Hicks's recording went down as one of the most "iconic and frightening" to emerge from the devastation of World War II, as the Washington Post put it, the raw audio of the Allied landings went unheard in its original recorded form for more than 75 years — until now.

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It was almost midnight when Army Capt. Travis Johnson was driving home from Fort Bragg last February, and came upon an overturned sedan smoldering on an embankment.

Johnson, a physician assistant assigned to the 1st Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, at the time, immediately stopped his car and rushed towards the vehicle, yelling out in case anyone was still inside the ticking time bomb.

There was: an injured man was trapped in the driver's seat, and none of the vehicle's doors would open.

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