(U.S. Army/ Sgt. Mike MacLeod)

KABUL, Afghanistan (Reuters) - U.S. and Taliban negotiators wrapped up their longest round of consecutive peace talks on Tuesday with progress made but no agreement on when foreign troops might withdraw, multiple sources said.

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YouTube/Paul Szoldra

There's a video going around, purportedly of soldiers in an unnamed African country jumping out the back of an aircraft, and unfortunately they can't jump good.

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Secretary of the Army Mark T. Esper, greets Paratroopers during his visit to Fort Bragg, N.C., Mar. 1, 2019. Esper was able to see the readiness of our Paratroopers as he was escorted through the Expert Infantry Badge lanes where leaders demonstrated their knowledge on weapons and tactical decision making. (U.S. Army Photo by Sgt. Gin-Sophie De Bellotte)

One of the nation's top Army leaders and one of North Carolina's congressional senators said Friday there is no reason why military families on Fort Bragg should have to live with housing concerns like lead paint, cockroaches and ants.

"I'd said the problems are unconscionable. There's no reason our soldiers and their families should live in the conditions they've lived in," said Secretary of the Army Mark T. Esper at a news conference that followed a town hall meeting.

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M-16A4 service rifles are stacked against a wall after urban operations training on Marine Corps Outlying Landing Field Atlantic, North Carolina, Feb. 18, 2016. 2D Low Altitude Air Defense Battalion conducted the training in preparation for deployment with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jodson B. Graves/Released)

Two Army explosive ordnance disposal soldiers have been indicted for allegedly trying to sell dozens of rifles, pistols, and C4 explosives to undercover federal agents in El Paso, Texas.

Tyler James Sumlin and Jason Wayne Jarvis showed up at a truck stop in El Paso, Texas on Nov. 14, 2018 and met with undercover agents from Homeland Security Investigations before following them to a nearby warehouse where they had agreed to exchange weapons for $75,000, according to a criminal complaint filed Nov. 15, 2018 in the Western District of Texas.

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Cris Weisbecker, Education Services Officer at the Wiesbaden Education Center, gives a presentation to U.S. Army Signal Soldiers about higher education opportunities and Army services during the 102nd Strategic Signal Battalion, 2nd Theater Signal Brigade, quarterly Soldier Development Program Jan. 18, 2018 in Wiesbaden, Germany. The Soldier Development Program provides Soldiers with information on a wide variety of personal and professional topics, including higher education, designed to grow junior Soldiers into future leaders. (U.S. Army photo by William B. King) (Photo Credit: William King)

In a recent open letter to Microsoft President Brad Smith and CEO Satya Nadella, a group of Microsoft workers demanded that Microsoft cancel its $479 million contract with the United States Army. Established last year, this contract committed Microsoft to supply technology for the Army's Integrated Visual Augmentation System (IVAS), leveraging its HoloLens augmented reality technology to design headsets for use in combat and training. The letter is the workers' refutation of creating technology for "warfare and oppression," arguing that the contract is Microsoft's foray into weapons development.

Rather than provide insight or commentary on the ethics of corporate cooperation with government, the letter lays bear the signatories' ignorance of warfare and combat trauma.

It is virtue signaling masquerading as thought leadership.

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(From left to right) Chris Osman, Chris McKinley, Kent Kroeker, and Talon Burton

At least four American veterans were among a group of eight men arrested by police in Haiti earlier this week for allegedly driving without license plates and possessing an arsenal of weaponry and tactical gear.

Police in Port-au-Prince arrested five Americans, two Serbians, and one Haitian man at a police checkpoint on Sunday, according to The Miami-Herald. The men reportedly told police they were on a "government mission" but did not specify for which government, according to The Herald.

They also told police that "their boss was going to call their boss," implying that someone high in Haiti's government would vouch for them and secure their release, Herald reporter Jacqueline Charles told NPR.

What they were actually doing or who they were potentially working for remains unclear. A State Department spokesperson told Task & Purpose they were aware that Haitian police arrested a "group of individuals, including some U.S. citizens," but declined to answer whether the men were employed by or operating under contract with the U.S. government.

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