The Navy's beleaguered USS Gerald R. Ford aircraft carrier may not have working weapons elevators, but it's certainly got some moves.

The $13 billion supercarrier on Wednesday returned to Newport News Shipbuilding in Virginia after several days of sea trials, a major step for a much-hyped carrier that just spent 15 months undergoing post-shakedown repairs to correct a slew of ongoing technical problems.

But just because only four of the Ford's 11 critical weapons elevators doesn't mean you can't still have fun. According to a fresh batch of photos uploaded to the Defense Visual Imagery Distribution System on Tuesday, the Ford's sea trials included a raucous round of high-speed turns.

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

In January, Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer promised President Donald Trump that the Ford's weapons elevators would be fully installed and operational by the time the carrier returned to the open ocean for fresh trials. No word yet on how that's going.

The USS Gerald R. Ford, the Navy's new supercarrier, can now land all of the service's planes, except for its new stealth fighter.

The Advanced Arresting Gear has been given a green light to recover all "propeller and jet" aircraft, to include the C-2A Greyhound, E-2C Hawkeye and E-2D Advanced Hawkeye, F/A-18E/F Super Hornet, and E/A-18G Growler, the Navy said in a statement Tuesday.

These aircraft can all conduct flight operations aboard the Ford.

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WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump told U.S. troops stationed in Japan he plans to order traditional steam powered catapults aboard American warships instead of newer electromagnetic systems that he said may not work as well during wartime.

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If the Pentagon had to take Consumer Math class in high school, they'd flunk.

The U.S. military—correction, the U.S. taxpayer—is spending more money to buy fewer weapons. The reason? Poor acquisition practices, according to a report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO).

"DOD's 2018 portfolio of major weapon programs has grown in cost by $8 billion, but contains four fewer systems than last year," GAO found.

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Brad Howard/Task & Purpose

What would you do if you had billions of dollars? Two carriers at the same time, man.

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Look, we give President Donald Trump shit for all sorts of reasons: confusion over evening colors, picking fights with the family members of fallen service members, tweeting too much, making service academy graduations about himself, and so on. The purpose of journalism is to challenge the powerful, no matter who they are, but I’ll be the first to admit when the commander-in-chief is right and the rest of the world is totally wrong.

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