Navy officials enlisted the help of executives with the Florida-based Carnival Cruise Line, the largest cruise company in the world, to identify solutions for the ongoing maintenance issues that have stranded a majority of the service's aircraft carriers in non-deployable status, Business Insider reports.

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The Navy's beleaguered USS Gerald R. Ford aircraft carrier may not have working weapons elevators, but it's certainly got some moves.

The $13 billion supercarrier on Wednesday returned to Newport News Shipbuilding in Virginia after several days of sea trials, a major step for a much-hyped carrier that just spent 15 months undergoing post-shakedown repairs to correct a slew of ongoing technical problems.

But just because only four of the Ford's 11 critical weapons elevators doesn't mean you can't still have fun. According to a fresh batch of photos uploaded to the Defense Visual Imagery Distribution System on Tuesday, the Ford's sea trials included a raucous round of high-speed turns.

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

In January, Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer promised President Donald Trump that the Ford's weapons elevators would be fully installed and operational by the time the carrier returned to the open ocean for fresh trials. No word yet on how that's going.

(U.S. Navy/Petty Officer 2nd Class Ryan Seelbach)

After 15 months at Newport News Shipbuilding, the USS Gerald R. Ford headed to sea Friday with some of its technical problems solved.

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As Rep. Elaine Luria sees it, this week's decision to extend the deployment of the USS Abraham Lincoln speaks to a more serious problem with the aircraft carrier fleet, and the evidence is front and center in Hampton Roads.

The Lincoln will remain deployed for an unspecified time because repairs are taking longer than expected on the USS Harry S. Truman, the carrier assigned to replace it.

But at the moment, not one of the Navy's six East Coast carriers — either at Naval Station Norfolk or Newport News Shipbuilding — are close to combat-ready, Luria said in a House Armed Services hearing this week.

So when a single carrier is sidelined longer than expected, it can become a problem.

In an exchange with Navy leaders, the Virginia Beach Democrat said: "So the taxpayers have made a good investment to have six carriers on the East Coast, plus I understand one on the West Coast — seven of our 11 carriers — in a non-deployable status, and we're having to extend the Lincoln on deployment because of one emergent casualty on one carrier? That's where you desire to be?"

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The USS Gerald R. Ford, the Navy's new supercarrier, can now land all of the service's planes, except for its new stealth fighter.

The Advanced Arresting Gear has been given a green light to recover all "propeller and jet" aircraft, to include the C-2A Greyhound, E-2C Hawkeye and E-2D Advanced Hawkeye, F/A-18E/F Super Hornet, and E/A-18G Growler, the Navy said in a statement Tuesday.

These aircraft can all conduct flight operations aboard the Ford.

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The chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee sharply criticized the Navy's failures with the new USS Gerald R. Ford aircraft carrier, saying that these missteps "ought to be criminal."

During the confirmation hearing for Vice Adm. Michael Gilday, who is set to become the next chief of naval operations, Sen. Jim Inhofe, a Republican from Oklahoma, unleashed a string of criticisms about the first ship of the Navy's Ford-class carriers.

"The ship was accepted by the Navy incomplete, nearly two years late, two and a half billion dollars over budget, and nine of eleven weapons still don't work with costs continuing to grow," the senator said.

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