Some 74 years ago, Richard Thelen, a then-18-year-old gunner's mate on the cruiser Indianapolis, vaulted into the air when a Japanese tornado sank the ship on July 30, 1945.

"I remember mostly how quickly it sunk. I had to stay alive out there. Every time I was ready to give up, I felt my dad's grip, and saw his face," said Thelen.

Only 317 of the ship's 1,196 sailors survived after five days afloat in the Pacific. Some died from dehydration; others were killed by sharks. It was the biggest loss of life in the Navy's history.

Now, a new Indianapolis is ready for service.

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U.S. Coast Guard/Petty Officer 1st Class David Bradbury

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Task & Purpose photo illustration by Aaron Provost/Jaws

Welcome to That One Scene, a semi-regular series in which Marine veteran and pop culture omnivore James Clark waxes nostalgic about that one scene from a beloved movie.

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U.S. Navy photo

The Navy announced on Saturday that the wreckage of the USS Indianapolis was found in the Philippine Sea at a depth of more than 18,000 feet below the water's surface.

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So long as the acting isn’t terrible, or the plot awful, even a mediocre film set during the Second World War is going to do well with an American audience. We love that shit — dead Nazis, all-American heroes, massive battles, and, most importantly, a major victory for the United States. In the coming months, we’ll see four more additions to this genre: “Hacksaw Ridge,” “Allied,” “Dunkirk,” and “USS Indianapolis: Men of Courage.”

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Photo by Kim Roller

Seventy years ago, the worst naval disaster in U.S. history and worst shark attack ever was overshadowed by the dropping of the world’s first atomic bomb over the city of Hiroshima.

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