Editor's Note: This article by Richard Sisk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The unemployment rate for post-9/11 veterans went up to 4.5% in September, standing out as an exception in a Labor Department report that showed overall joblessness at a 50-year low of 3.5%.

The unemployment rate for post-9/11 veterans, who are classified as "Gulf War-era II veterans" by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, contrasted with the 3.1% rate for all veterans, the BLS said in its monthly report.

It was the fifth time in the last six months that the unemployment rate for post-9/11 veterans has gone up, according to BLS.

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Photo via Department of Veterans Affairs

The U.S. economy has improved significantly over the past several years, and veterans now find themselves in a much better place than the years immediately following the recession.

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Photo via Department of Veterans Affairs

Month after month, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that U.S. veterans are doing better than non-veterans in the job market. In October, the BLS indicated that veteran unemployment was just 2.7%, compared to 3.8% for non-vets.

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Marine Corps photo by Pfc. Damaris Arias

Post-9/11 era U.S. military veterans are better-paid, better-educated, and have a higher quality of life on average than people who never served, a new quantitative study concludes, challenging popular assumptions that the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are producing a generation of damaged Americans.

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Air Force photo by 2nd Lt. Brooke Betit

If you served in Iraq or Afghanistan and have found yourself seemingly unable to find work since separation, you’re not alone: Post-9/11 veterans continue to face higher rates of unemployment than both their civilian counterparts and among veterans as a whole, according to a new report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kaylee Dubois

Cainan Austin was the first baby born in Concord, New Hampshire, in 2017, but his arrival marked a bittersweet occasion for his dad. In order to be present for his son’s birth, Army veteran Lamar Austin had to call out of work at his new job.

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