Photo via DoD

This article was originally published on The Conversation

Read More Show Less
U.S. Army photo

No more “Post-9/11,” no more “Montgomery” (for those who remember it, anyway): A bipartisan slate of senators and congressmen, assisted by major veterans service organizations and other vets advocacy groups, is set to unveil its plan for a “forever” GI Bill today. And in a topsy-turvy year where very little is happening in Congress policy-wise, a broad, permanent bill of rights for student veterans and their families has a pretty good chance of sailing through the government.

Read More Show Less
Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Sam Spain

Roughly 928,000 spouses and dependents have used the Post-9/11 G.I. Bill funding to attend schools in the first five years the benefit was offered, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs. Though some lawmakers suggest that regulations be tightened to lower the number of transfers, benefits remain transferrable at the time of this writing.

Read More Show Less
Photo by Spc. Nathan Thome

College is the next step for many people leaving the military. As a transition pathway, this makes a lot of sense. Yet somehow a lot of us get lost in the process: going to the wrong school, pursuing the wrong degree, and even failing to graduate. Many veterans fumble during their transition because they view college through a narrow lens, emphasizing a simplistic view of a degree as a "check in the box." These folks miss out of other opportunities that could substantially improve their lives after service.

Read More Show Less
Photo by Spc. Rochelle Krueger

Active military and veterans gathered March 26, at the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center, in Washington, D.C., for the Improving Veteran’s Education Symposium. Hosted by National Louis University, the focus of the discussion was the college’s Education to Employment program, which was launched in 2012 with the help of a $750,000 grant from the Robert R. McCormick Foundation.

Read More Show Less
Photo via Wikimedia Commons

More than 100 million people are estimated to tune in to Sunday’s Super Bowl showdown between the Seahawks and the Patriots. But there’s a subplot to the stage for the game --- the Arizona Cardinals’ stadium in Glendale, Arizona --- that speaks to a contentious topic in the modern military veterans’ world.

Read More Show Less
© 2018 Hirepurpose. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service.