Sixty-four years after James Dean's fatal car crash, Hollywood has a new role for the "Rebel Without a Cause."

With the help of "full-body" CGI, which uses real footage and photos, Dean, who died in 1955 at age 24, will posthumously play Rogan in the live action Vietnam era-film, "Finding Jack," according to The Hollywood Reporter Wednesday. The film, adapted from Gareth Crocker's 2011 novel of the same name, focuses on the over 10,000 military dogs abandoned following the end of the Vietnam War.

Read More Show Less

A virtual Vietnam War memorial is nearing completion, and you can help.

The Vietnam Veteran Memorial Fund (VVMF) is searching for photos of five Columbus, Georgia, Vietnam War casualties.

The campaign, which can be viewed at vvmf.org/Wall-of-Faces, features a page dedicated to honoring and remembering every person whose name is inscribed on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. As of Thursday, the campaign has matched 1,585 pictures with Georgia veterans, and only 23 names from the Peach State remain without a photo, according to VVMF Vice President of Programs and Communications Heidi Zimmerman.

Read More Show Less

Editor's Note: This article by Hope Hodge Seck originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

In the wake of a heartwarming viral video that was featured everywhere from Good Morning America to the Daily Mail comes a disheartening revelation: The 84-year-old self-described Army nurse cranking out push-ups in her crisp Vietnam-era uniform might not be who she said she was.

Maggie DeSanti, allegedly a retired Army lieutenant colonel who rappeled out of helicopters in Vietnam, was captured in a video challenging a TSA agent to a push-up competition ahead of a flight to Washington, D.C., with the Arizona chapter of the organization Honor Flight on Oct. 16. The video soon was everywhere, and many who shared it, including Honor Flight, hailed DeSanti's toughness and spirit.

Read More Show Less

John Vincent, a 69-year-old Vietnam veteran in hospice care had one final request: To say goodbye to his best friend, a 5-year-old Yorkie named Patch.

Read More Show Less
Byron Fuller (Courtesy photo via Florida Times-Union)

Navy pilot Byron Fuller spent almost six years as a prisoner of war in North Vietnam, where his battered body was tortured and starved, where he endured more than two years in solitary confinement in a 4-by-7-foot cell.

Upon his release in 1973 from Hoa Lo, a prison camp known to the world as the Hanoi Hilton, he strode across the tarmac at Jacksonville Naval Air Station, a huge smile on his face, with his wife and four children by his side. He briefly addressed the crowd gathered to greet him: "America, America, how beautiful you are ... Tonight my cup runneth over."

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Army photo)

Editor's Note: The following is an op-ed. The opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Task & Purpose.

Last week Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA) shared with the country the findings of our two year investigation into foreign trolls who target troops and veterans online, which includes new evidence of foreign-born election interference related to the 2020 presidential campaign.

Macedonians took over and promoted a "Vets for Trump" Facebook page — spreading misinformation about voting along with racist and Islamaphobic propaganda, and engaging in Russian-style election interference, attacking democratic 2020 candidates.

Online entities from Russia, Bulgaria, Ukraine and Vietnam are persistently pretending to be our congressionally chartered veterans service organization — pushing hateful and divisive content alongside VVA-branded material that they're selling on websites which both scrape financial information from troops and veterans, and infect victims' computers with malware.

Trolls from Nigeria have a blossoming criminal empire that involves the identity theft of service members — names and photos of people who serve our country are then used as bait to lure elderly Americans into romance scams, costing some of them their life-savings, which has led several victims to suicide already.

This week, two more disturbing reports were released documenting the increasing dangers of predatory foreign entities online. Oxford University's Computational Propaganda Research Project showed us that at least 70 countries have experienced disinformation campaigns, and that the problem is growing.

Cisco's Talos Intelligence revealed that an imposter website made to look like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's "Hire Our Heroes" was infecting job-seeking troops and veterans' computers with a host of dangerous malware.

Read More Show Less
© 2018 Hirepurpose. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service.