From left to right: Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher, former Army 1st Lt. Clint Lorance, and Army Maj. Matthew Golsteyn (Associated Press/U.S. Army photos)

President Donald Trump is poised to order the Army to dismiss charges against Maj. Matthew Golsteyn and former 1st Lt. Clint Lorance and force the Navy to make SEAL Eddie Gallagher a chief again, Fox News contributor Pete Hegseth stated on Monday.

Gallagher was found not guilty of killing a wounded ISIS fighter but he was convicted of posing for a picture with the dead man and demoted to first class petty officer. Golsteyn is accused of murder after repeatedly admitting he killed an unarmed Afghan man 10 years ago, whom he believed was a Taliban bomb maker. Lorance was convicted of murder in August 2013 for ordering his soldiers to open fire on three unarmed Afghan men whom he believed were Taliban bomb makers, killing two of them.

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KABUL (Reuters) - Afghan security units backed by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) have carried out extrajudicial executions, enforced disappearances, indiscriminate air strikes and other rights abuses and should be disbanded, a rights group said on Thursday.

Human Rights Watch said it investigated 14 cases in which CIA-backed Afghan counterinsurgency forces committed serious abuses in Afghanistan between late 2017 and mid-2019.

"They are illustrative of a larger pattern of serious laws-of-war violations — some amounting to war crimes — that extends to all provinces in Afghanistan where these paramilitary forces operate with impunity," the group said in a report.

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Political prisoners prior to the 1972 Trelew Massacre, which say the death of 16 prisoners and the attempted killings of three other inmates at an Argentine naval base (Public domain)

For years, a former Argentine naval officer was living in a $1 million waterfront home with a pool and dock in the Sans Souci Estates neighborhood of North Miami.

At 7 a.m. Friday, U.S. Marshals Service deputies knocked on his door and took him into custody to send him back to Argentina over a massacre he's accused of leading nearly 50 years ago.

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Maj. Matthew Golsteyn in Afghanistan. (Photo courtesy of Philip Stackhouse.)

Prosecutors plan to argue that the man a former Special Forces soldier is accused of killing in February 2010 was a farmer, not a bomb-maker for the Taliban.

A military judge heard motions Monday in the case against Maj. Mathew Golsteyn, who in June pleaded not guilty in the killing of an unarmed Afghan national named Rasoul. The trial is set for Dec. 2.

Golsteyn was a Green Beret captain with Fort Bragg's 3rd Special Forces Group. He contends the killing was justified under the wartime conditions in Afghanistan because the man was thought to be an insurgent who made a bomb that killed two Marines.

A prosecutor, Maj. Brent Goodwin, said Rasoul was a poor farmer with no connection to the Taliban. The man was uneducated and had no training in explosive devices, Goodwin said.

"Rasoul was not a bombmaker," Goodwin said.

Capt. Nina Hillner, a defense lawyer, said Rasoul's brother said Rasoul was a member of the Taliban.

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Maj. Matthew Golsteyn in Afghanistan. (Photo courtesy of Philip Stackhouse.)

Nearly a decade after he allegedly murdered an unarmed Afghan civilian during a 2010 deployment, the case of Army Maj. Matthew Golsteyn is finally going to trial.

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(U.S. Navy/Associated Press/Andrew Harnik)

President Donald Trump's nominee for the Navy's top officer wants to identify the "root causes" of the slew of misconduct that's roiled the Naval Special Warfare community in recent years despite a relatively recent Pentagon review that found "no gaps" in the ethics and professional training for U.S. special operations forces.

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