A federal court has denied Pratt & Whitney's efforts to dismiss a whistle-blower suit accusing the aerospace giant of falsifying inspection reports and selling billions of dollars of possibly defective jet engines to the military between 2012 and 2015.

Pratt has been trying to kill the suit since it was first filed, under seal, in 2016. But Judge Janet C. Hall, in a decision made public Wednesday, said the latest version of the complaint by former Pratt engineer of metallurgist Peter J. Bonzani, Jr. can proceed because it contains information Bonzani recently obtained about the company's F119 engine contract with the U.S. Air Force.

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Photo: AP/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

If you thought the chaos descending on Washington was anywhere close to clearing up, I have bad news for you: A second whistleblower has come forward.

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WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump has ordered a substantial reduction in the staff of the National Security Council, according to five people familiar with the plans, as the White House confronts an impeachment inquiry touched off by a whistleblower complaint related to the agency's work.

Some of the people described the staff cuts as part of a White House effort to make its foreign policy arm leaner under new national security adviser Robert O'Brien.

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Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

As President Donald Trump faces an unprecedented impeachment inquiry, he's taken to his comfort zone, using Twitter to attack Congress, the media, and the anonymous intelligence whistleblower who filed a complaint against him.

In the 24 hours since the explosive whistleblower complaint was released, Trump has used social media to aggressively defend himself.

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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo attends an event hosted by the U.S. Department of State's Energy Resources Governance Initiative at the Palace Hotel on the sidelines of the 74th session of the United Nations General Assembly in New York City, New York, U.S., September 26, 2019. (Reuters/Darren Ornitz)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Three Democratic-led House of Representatives Committees issued subpoenas on Friday for Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, seeking to compel him to hand over documents concerning contact with the Ukrainian government.

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A New York Times report published on Thursday outed the anonymous intelligence community whistleblower at the center of a presidential impeachment inquiry as a CIA officer and provided clues to his identity that will likely make it easier for The White House and other observers to identify him.

Three people familiar with the officer's identity told the Times he is a CIA officer who was detailed to work at The White House and has since returned to the CIA. The report added that, based on the newly-released whistleblower complaint, he "was an analyst by training" who was "steeped in details of American foreign policy toward Europe, demonstrating a sophisticated understanding of Ukrainian politics and at least some knowledge of the law."

As the Times notes, CIA officers routinely work in The White House, often working on the National Security Council or managing secure communications with foreign leaders. But this officer didn't work on the communications team, the Times reported.

That level of detail spurred widespread criticism of the Times from lawyers, intelligence professionals, former government officials, journalists, and others.

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