I didn't think a movie about World War I would, or even could, remind me of Afghanistan.

Somehow 1917 did, and that's probably the highest praise I can give Sam Mendes' newest war drama: It took a century-old conflict and made it relatable.

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A scene from 1917 (Universal Pictures)

Editor's Note: This article by James Barber originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The new movie "1917" recreates the experience of troops on the ground during World War I through the story of two young soldiers sent on a dangerous mission to the front lines.

The movie won't get a nationwide release until Jan. 10, 2020, but Universal Pictures is inviting readers to free advance screenings at 15 military bases, as well as local theaters in more than 40 markets, before the official release.

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A new trailer just dropped for the upcoming World War I action flick The Great War.

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Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

Creating a realistic battle scene — whether it's from World War II or the Napoleonic Wars — demands technical know-how and precise attention to detail.

Paul Biddiss, the military technical adviser on the upcoming World War I movie 1917, taught the actors everything they needed to know, from proper foot care to how to hold a weapon, "which allows the actor to concentrate on his primary task. Acting!" Biddis told Insider.

Biddiss has worked on projects from a variety of time periods — "large Napoleonic battles through to World War I, World War II, right up to modern-day battles with Special Forces," Biddiss said.

Read on to learn about how Biddiss prepared 1917 performers for the gruesome, grueling warfare of World War I.

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Leonard Inman, a black World War I soldier who was buried in an unmarked grave more than 40 years ago, is finally getting the dignity that he was denied after serving his country.

A Lafayette, Indiana, chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution helped get a headstone for Inman after discovering that his name was misspelled in a 1919 Tippecanoe County World War I Honor Roll book, according to the Lafayette Journal & Courier.

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The Colt Model 1911 .45 caliber semiautomatic pistol that John Browning dreamed up more than a century ago remains on of the most beloved sidearms in U.S. military history. Hell, there's a reason why Army Gen. Scott Miller, the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan, still rocks an M1911A1 on his hip despite the fact that the Army no longer issues them to soldiers.

But if scoring one of the Army's remaining M1911s through the Civilian Marksmanship Program isn't enough to satisfy your adoration for the classic sidearm, then Colt has something right up your alley: the Colt Model 1911 'Black Army' pistol.

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