Boyfriends can sometimes do some really weird shit. Much of it is well-meaning: A boy I liked in high school once sang me a screamo song that he wrote over the phone. He thought it would be sweet, and while I appreciated that he wanted to share it with me, I also had no idea what he was saying. Ah, young love.

Sure, this sounds cringeworthy. But then there's 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Cory Booker, who appears to be, dare I say, the best boyfriend?

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More than 74 years after Marines raised the American flag on Mount Suribachi, Iwo Jima, the Marine Corps has announced that one of men in the most famous picture of World War II had been misidentified.

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Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider

In September 1940, World War II was a year old. The US was still a noncombatant, but it was preparing for a fight.

That month, the US introduced the Selective Training and Service Act — the first peacetime draft in US history. Mobilizing the millions of troops was a monumental task and essential to deploying "the arsenal of democracy" that President Franklin D. Roosevelt called on Americans to provide.

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Tom Hanks and Stephen Spielberg are bringing the third series in its Band of Brothers franchise to Apple TV+, which will highlight the American bomber crews who fought the air war over Nazi Germany during World War II, according to Deadline.

Based on the 2007 book Masters of the Air: America's Bomber Boys Who Fought the Air War Against Nazi Germany, the series will focus on the enlisted men of the Eighth Air Force, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

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This is what it sounds like when more than 156,000 enormous pairs of balls roll up on a French beach ready to kick some Nazi ass.

During the D-Day landings at Normandy on June 6, 1944, radio correspondent George Hicks recorded 13 minutes of audio on a Recordgraph tape recording system that viscerally captured the unbridled death and destruction of the largest amphibious landing in the history of warfare.

And while Hicks's recording went down as one of the most "iconic and frightening" to emerge from the devastation of World War II, as the Washington Post put it, the raw audio of the Allied landings went unheard in its original recorded form for more than 75 years — until now.

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Pfc. Domingo Urioste Sr. stood 5 feet, 5½ inches tall, weighed 152 pounds and fought the Nazis in some of World War II's bloodiest battles.

He was part of the wave of U.S. soldiers who landed at Utah Beach in the invasion of Normandy. Army records show that Urioste, a rifle sharpshooter and heavy machine gunner, also saw combat in Rhineland, Central Europe and Ardennes, better known as the Battle of the Bulge.

Somewhere along that trail of pain and death, Urioste pulled a large canister from a stream. His children aren't sure where this happened. Urioste was always tight-lipped about the war.

Inside the cylinder was Nazi Germany's red-and-white flag, emblazoned with a swastika. Urioste brought it home to New Mexico after his honorable discharge Oct. 30, 1945.

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