Companies make a big stink out of their efforts to employ U.S. service members who are transitioning out of military service, but veterans still face a major obstacle when it comes to the actual hiring process: they're seen as unemotional, unfeeling, and lacking in interpersonal skills — and that screws them over when it come to certain jobs.

New research from Duke University's Fuqua School of Business, based on experiments involving more than 3,000 participants and published in the journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Process, indicates that veteran job candidates are widely seen as possessing a "calm under pressure and having a get-it-done kind of attitude," according to lead researcher
Aaron Kay.

But while those traits are normally appealing, Kay said that the changing nature of the U.S. economy means that many new jobs "many new types of jobs also require creativity, interpersonal skills and emotional capacity" — traits that civilians assume military veterans fundamentally lack.

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Ryan Kules

Editor's note: A combat wounded veteran, Ryan served in the U.S. Army as an armor officer assigned to 1st Battalion, 13th Armor Regiment. While deployed to Iraq in 2005, his vehicle was hit with an improvised explosive device buried in the road. He works as the Wounded Warrior Project's national Combat Stress Recovery Program director.

On Nov. 29, 2005, my life changed forever. I was a 24-year-old U.S. Army armor captain deployed to Taji, Iraq, when my vehicle was struck by an improvised explosive device. On that day, I lost two of my soldiers, Sgts. Jerry Mills and Donald Hasse, and I lost my right arm and left leg.

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U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Jennifer Spradlin

In its 15-year history, Wounded Warrior Project has the distinction of being one of the fastest-growing charities in history and one of the most rapidly shrinking.

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U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Jennifer Spradlin

A senator’s investigation into the Wounded Warrior Project after allegations of lavish spending last year has concluded that there were problems, but the organization is working to repair them.

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Associated Press photo by Andrew Harnik

“You've risked all that you have, all that you possess, to keep our people safe and our democracy secure,” President Donald Trump Trump told a crowd of wounded veterans on Thursday, as he welcomed them to the White House.

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U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Jennifer Spradlin

Wounded Warrior Project has begun to cut the size of its 600-person workforce as it hits the reset button after months of upheaval at the Jacksonville-based organization, which faced a backlash after media reports in January questioned its spending practices.

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