Leonard Inman, a black World War I soldier who was buried in an unmarked grave more than 40 years ago, is finally getting the dignity that he was denied after serving his country.

A Lafayette, Indiana, chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution helped get a headstone for Inman after discovering that his name was misspelled in a 1919 Tippecanoe County World War I Honor Roll book, according to the Lafayette Journal & Courier.

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Photo: National Archives.

House lawmakers are pushing for a Pentagon review of valor awards given out for service in World War I to ensure that minorities are getting the recognition they deserve.

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The nation's highest award for valor is getting the "Wham," "Bam," and "Kapow" treatment.

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Task & Purpose illustration by Matt Battaglia

During World War I, beyond the wire and away from the confines of the trenches lived the wild men of No Man’s Land. These soldiers — stragglers from seven armies that clashed on the battlefields of Europe — came together as a band of deserters to make a home in the desolate space between their warring countrymen, slipping into abandoned trenches to scavenge for loot and food to stay alive. In the first global war, they became soldiers with no nation.

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Army photo

Ask any soldier about the most essential part of their MRE,  and I guarantee most of them will say either the hot sauce or the instant coffee. And during World War I, the reply would likely be the same minus the hot sauce.

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