The rediscovered dog tags of fallen WWII soldier Roger Taylor that will be presented to the Beloit Historical Society at their "Remebering Roger" memorial service Sunday Dec. 29, 2019. (CantonRep.com / Aaron Self via Tribune News Service)

BELOIT, Ohio -- Pfc. Roger W. Taylor left his family's farm in the Beloit area 75 years ago for deployment to Europe during World War II.

He never came home.

But the dog tags he wore during his 22 months of Army service finally finished their journey back to his home town.

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Battle of the Bulge veteran Malcolm "Buck" Marsh, A Company, 36th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Armored Division, takes part in the ceremony for the 75th anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge at the Mardasson Memorial in Bastogne, Belgium, Dec. 16, 2019. (DOD, Lisa Ferdinando)

An Army veteran of the Battle of the Bulge made the history books come alive with his short speech during a 75th anniversary commemoration in Bastogne, Belgium.

Malcolm "Buck" Marsh Jr., who spoke at the event yesterday, was a soldier in the 36th Armored Infantry Regiment when the Nazis attacked on Dec. 16, 1944. His unit was part of the 3rd Armored Division and it was rushed in to stop the German onslaught.

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Belgian nurse Augusta Chiwy, left, talks with author and military historian Martin King moments before receiving an award for valor from the U.S. Army, in Brussels, Dec. 12, 2011. (Associated Press/Yves Logghe)

Editor's note: a version of this story first appeared in 2015.

Most people haven't heard of an elderly Belgian-Congolese nurse named Augusta Chiwy. But students of history know that adversity and dread can turn on a dime into freedom and change, and it's often the most humble and little-known individuals who are the drivers of it.

During the very darkest days of the Battle of the Bulge in World War II, Chiwy was such a catalyst, and hundreds of Americans lived because of her. She died quietly on Aug. 23, 2015, at the age of 94 at her home in Brussels, Belgium, and had it not been for the efforts of my friend — British military historian Martin King — the world may never have heard her astonishing story.

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The USS West Virginia (left) next to the USS Tennessee during the attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. (U.S. Navy photo)

The attack on Pearl Harbor happened 78 years ago on Saturday.

The Japanese attack on the U.S. naval base in Hawaii killed more than 2,400 American sailors and civilians and wounded 1,000 more.

Japanese fighter planes also destroyed or damaged almost 20 naval ships and more than 300 planes during the attack.

Several photos were captured during the attack, some of which have become iconic of that infamous day.

Here are the stories behind five of those unforgettable images.

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Photo: Soeren Stache/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

Laureen Nussbaum pulled a 76-year-old diary off a bookshelf in her Wallingford apartment. When her German refugee family lived in the Netherlands during the Nazi occupation, they took turns writing in it.

"Finis — Antisemitismus!!" her father wrote as Allied liberators ended the Holocaust. Underneath is the yellow star — branded with the word "jood," Dutch for "Jew" — he no longer had to wear.

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Veterans Day at the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery, 11 November, 2018. (U.S. Army/Erich Backes)

Crammed inside the small sanctuary of the West Congregational Church in Taunton, more than a hundred community members, first responders and military veterans of all branches stood before the coffin of a local World War II veteran to pay their respects and take the place of his departed family.

"I may not have known Arthur, but the outpouring of support for him here today speaks volumes to his character," Taunton's Acting Mayor Donald Cleary said on Saturday morning.

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