AsSoldier watches as a UH-60 Blackhawk Helicopter prepares to land during an advise and assistance mission in southeastern Afghanistan, Aug. 4, 2019. (U.S. Army/Master Sgt. Alejandro Licea)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

The Washington Post reported this week that a cache of materials about the war in Afghanistan revealed that the U.S. mission there was failing spectacularly, leading to increasing service member and contractor deaths — not to mention tens of thousands of civilian casualties over the past two decades.

The internal documents obtained by the Washington Post have increased scrutiny of one of the most solemn ways the war is felt — the body count. Over 2,300 U.S. troops have died during the course of the war, along with 1,145 NATO and coalition troops. Presently, there are about 13,000 U.S. troops in Afghanistan.

Those tolls are likely exceeded, however, by that of the U.S. contractors who quietly performed some of the war's most dangerous functions — and whose deaths the Pentagon has never felt obligated to report to Americans.

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Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

President Donald Trump on Monday afternoon walked out of the White House with Conan, the military working dog who helped taken down ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi in northwest Syria in late October.

Speaking to reporters, Trump described Conan as "the world's most famous dog" who had an "incredible story."

"It was a flawless attack," Trump said, describing the special forces raid. "And al-Baghdadi is gone."

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Democratic 2020 U.S. presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden (Reuters photo)

A heartbreaking war story former Vice President Joe Biden has told on the campaign trail for years never actually happened, according to a new report in the Washington Post.

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Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Lyman Dickinson, an aviation-survival technician, is lowered into the water during a search-and-rescue exercise with the Mexican navy off the coast of Ensenada, Mexico, June 7, 2017. (U.S. Coast Guard/Petty Officer 3rd Class Joel Guzman)

Twenty-four days into the longest government shutdown in U.S. history, the strain is being felt acutely by the U.S. Coast Guard, as some 42,000 active-duty members are preparing to miss their first paycheck on January 15.

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