The Taliban Wants A Second Round Of Talks With The US

Code Red News
Resolute Support

The Taliban is ready for a second round of direct talks with the United States that may take place sometime this month, according to the Associated Press.


Taliban officials met with Alice Wells, an American diplomat, in July. In that meeting, the Taliban asked for U.S. recognition of its political office in Qatar and an end to "restrictions against its top leaders before the start of the formal negotiations," the AP reported.

Talks between the two sides are preliminary, although both have expressed the hope that some negotiated settlement of the Afghan war can be reached. The top American commander in Afghanistan said in July that he was open to the idea of directly speaking with the Taliban.

M. Suhail Shaheen, the spokesman for the Taliban's political office, wrote in a June statement that negotiation is the "best way" to resolve the war, while outlining some confidence-building steps the U.S. could take to move talks forward, including prisoner exchanges and dropping Taliban members from an international blacklist.

Related: This Analysis Of Taliban Peace Talks Started Out As A Conversation About Hemorrhoids »

The U.S. requested a two-month ceasefire during the upcoming Afghan elections in the previous meeting, according to AP, although no agreement was reached.

Still, although any kind of negotiation to end the nearly 17-year-old war at this point seems to be good news, these preliminary talks still have a long way to go. The Obama administration previously tried to talk directly with the Taliban for more than a year before negotiations were blown up by Afghan President Hamid Karzai, who was angered over his exclusion from the talks and the Taliban's opening of the Qatar office in front of its flag and a sign declaring the "Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan."

(Cecil Field POW/MIA Memorial, Inc./Facebook)

Military veterans from throughout Northeast Florida came together Saturday morning to honor comrades in arms who were prisoners of war or missing in action, and remember their sacrifice.

Read More
The remains of Army Staff Sgt. Ian McLaughlin arrived back to Fort Bragg a week after he was killed Jan. 11 by an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan. (U.S. Army)

After the plane landed, Pope Army Airfield was silent on Saturday.

A chaplain prayed and a family member sobbed.

Tarah McLaughlin's fingers traced her husband's flag-draped coffin before she pressed two fingers to her lips then pressed her fingers to the coffin.

The remains of Staff Sgt. Ian McLaughlin, 29, of Newport News, Virginia, arrived back to Fort Bragg a week after he was killed Jan. 11 by an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan.

Pfc. Miguel Angel Villalon, 21, of Joliet, Illinois, also was killed in the same incident.

Read More

The Space Force has a name tape now

popular

The U.S. Space Force has a name tape for uniforms now. Get excited people.

In a tweet from its official account, the Space Force said its uniform name tapes have "touched down in the Pentagon," sharing a photo of it on the chest of Gen. John W. Raymond, the newly-minted Chief of Space Operations for the new service branch nested in the Department of the Air Force.

Read More

PALM BEACH, Fla. (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump gave a minute-to-minute account of the U.S. drone strikes that killed Iranian military commander Qassem Soleimani in remarks to a Republican fund-raising dinner on Friday night, according to audio obtained by CNN.

With his typical dramatic flourish, Trump recounted the scene as he monitored the strikes from the White House Situation Room when Soleimani was killed.

Read More

The U.S. Navy will name its fourth Ford-class aircraft carrier after Doris Miller, an iconic World War II sailor recognized for his heroism during the Pearl Harbor attack, according to reports in The Honolulu Star-Advertiser and U.S. Naval Institute News.

Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly is expected to announce the naming of CVN-81 during a ceremony on Monday in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, according to USNI. Two of Miller's nieces are expected to be there, according to the Star-Advertiser.

Read More