The Lamest Hobby Led To This Lifesaving Bulletproof Shield

Gear

Being told that it’s a good idea to take cover when rounds start flying isn’t news to anyone, or at least it shouldn’t be. But being able to pop up a bulletproof wall wherever you are, then drop it down and carry it away by yourself when you’re done, that is new.


Created by a group of mechanical engineers at Brigham Young University in Utah, the shield is bulletproof, lightweight, and designed with law enforcement in mind, notes LikeCool. Unlike a typical ballistic shield that offers protection to just the wielder — unless you’re doing some Spartan phalanx-style shit — this can provide static cover for up to three people. The barrier is based off of an origami design called Yoshimura, and the creased pattern allows it to expand and envelop the user, providing protection to the sides as well as the front.

In testing, the barrier was able to stop incoming rounds from a 9 mm, .357 Magnum, and .44 Magnum pistols, according to a statement uploaded to the University’s YouTube channel. It’s made from 12 layers of kevlar and weighs in at 55 pounds, which may sound heavy, but it’s about half as light as other-steel based barriers that come close to 100 pounds.

It does make you wonder though: Did the engineers go through a bunch of other origami designs first? Is there a large bulletproof swan in a warehouse somewhere?

(U.S. Army/Pfc. Hubert D. Delany III)

More than 7,500 boots on display at Fort Bragg this month served as a temporary memorial to service members from all branches who have died since 9/11.

The boots — which had the service members' photos and dates of death — were on display for Fort Bragg's Directorate of Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation's annual Run, Honor and Remember 5k on May 18 and for the 82nd Airborne Division's run that kicked off All American Week.

"It shows the families the service members are still remembered, honored and not forgotten," said Charlotte Watson, program manager of Fort Bragg's Survivor Outreach Services.

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After more than a decade of research and development and upwards of $500 million in funding, the Navy finally plans on testing its much-hyped electromagnetic railgun on a surface warship in a major milestone for the beleaguered weapons system, Navy documents reveal.

The Navy's latest Northwest Training and Testing draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Assessment (NWTT EIS/OEIS), first detailed by the Seattle Times on Friday, reveals that " the kinetic energy weapon (commonly referred to as the rail gun) will be tested aboard surface vessels, firing explosive and non-explosive projectiles at air- or sea-based targets."

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(U.S. Army/Sgt. Amber Smith)

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- Congress fell short ahead of Memorial Day weekend, failing to pass legislation that would provide tax relief for the families of military personnel killed during their service.

Senators unanimously approved a version of the bipartisan Gold Star Family Tax Relief Act Tuesday sending it back to the House of Representatives, where it was tied to a retirement savings bill as an amendment, and passed Thursday.

When it got back to the Senate, the larger piece of legislation failed to pass and make its way to the President Trump's desk.

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In less than three years after the National Security Agency found itself subject to an unprecedentedly catastrophic hacking episode, one of the agency's most powerful cyber weapons is reportedly being turned against American cities with alarming frequency by the very foreign hackers it was once intended to counter.

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(U.S. Marine Corps/Cpl. Scott Schmidt)

Editor's Note: This article by Richard Sisk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The spectacle of hundreds of thousands of motorcycles roaring their way through the streets of Washington, D.C., to Memorial Day events as part of the annual Rolling Thunder veterans tribute will be a thing of the past after this coming weekend.

Former Army Sgt. Artie Muller, a 73-year-old Vietnam veteran and co-founder of Rolling Thunder, said the logistics and costs of staging the event for Memorial Day, which falls on May 27 this year, were getting too out of hand to continue. The ride had become a tradition in D.C. since the first in 1988.

"It's just a lot of money," said the plainspoken Muller, who laced an interview with a few epithets of regret over having to shut down Rolling Thunder.

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