Why Does The Marine Corps Not Have A Dedicated Opposition Force?

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A Soldier assigned to 2nd Battalion, 22nd Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division (LI), shoulder-fires his M240B machine gun with blank firing adapter during Mountain Peak here at Fort Drum, 14 March, 2018. 1BCT is supporting 2nd Brigade Combat Team by operating as oppositional forces for the exercise.

A Soldier assigned to 2nd Battalion, 22nd Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division (LI), shoulder-fires his M240B machine gun with blank firing adapter during Mountain Peak here at Fort Drum, 14 March, 2018. 1BCT is supporting 2nd Brigade Combat Team by operating as oppositional forces for the exercise.

I was idly paging through the February issue of the “Marine Corps Gazette,” which focused on military innovation. I wasn’t seeing much until I got to page 53 and saw that question: Why does the Marine Corps not have an opposition force?

That’s a dang good question. OPFORs teach units memorable lessons but don’t charge for them in blood. Being in an OPFOR is also a great way to train small unit leaders to think innovatively.

This house resolves that the Marine Corps should indeed have an OPFOR.

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