Damn Millennials!

Author:
Publish date:
British officers inspect a group of American sailors for impressment into the British navy, ca. 1810, in a drawing by Howard Pyle. The practice angered Americans and was one cause of the War of 1812. But American naval officers engaged in the same practice against British sailors.

British officers inspect a group of American sailors for impressment into the British navy, ca. 1810, in a drawing by Howard Pyle. The practice angered Americans and was one cause of the War of 1812. But American naval officers engaged in the same practice against British sailors.

Sometimes when I read commentary on today’s U.S. military, I think that the biggest problem older service members have is with their younger comrades.

This thought was provoked by an article in the March issue of “Proceedings” that states, “We have overadjusted policies to recruit and retain Sailors based on the prevailing millennial ‘profile’—particularly, the perceived need for millennials to be reassured that what they are doing is okay. Our ribbon racks appear to be getting very ‘me’ (personal award) heavy when compared to the number of ‘we’ awards and decorations, at the expense of teamwork and forceful backup. When everyone is told they are special, it gets hard to tell who really is.”

Maybe “Proceedings,” “Marine Corps Gazette” and “ARMY” should just each have a monthly column called, “Damn Millennials!” In them, each month a senior NCO or aging officer would bellyache about what those kids are doing now on the grass.

Image placeholder title