Brad Lieurance (Courtesy photo)

Editor's Note: The following story highlights a veteran at Xerox committed to including talented members of the military community in its workplace. Xerox is a client of Hirepurpose, a Task & Purpose sister company. Learn More.

Brad Lieurance was never one to settle. From his time in college through his 25 years in the Army to his career with Xerox, he has pushed the limits and achieved success in ways he never thought possible. Now Lieurance is using his experiences to encourage others to step outside the career comfort zone.

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Kimberly Bryant, second from the left (Courtesy photo)

Editor's Note: The following story highlights a veteran at Comcast committed to including talented members of the military community in its workplace. Comcast is a client of Hirepurpose, a Task & Purpose sister company. Learn More.

The night of September 11, 2001, Kimberly Bryant drove her boyfriend to the airport to deploy immediately to the Middle East. "That was the last time I saw the man I knew, the man I fell in love with," she recalls. On that deployment, her boyfriend was severely injured and returned home with a traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder. When he was medically retired and deemed unemployable, with 100 percent disability from the Department of Veterans Affairs, various people told her that she had no obligation to him, but she couldn't walk away.

"I knew the person he was before this happened," she says. They got engaged, married, and raised a family together.

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Companies make a big stink out of their efforts to employ U.S. service members who are transitioning out of military service, but veterans still face a major obstacle when it comes to the actual hiring process: they're seen as unemotional, unfeeling, and lacking in interpersonal skills — and that screws them over when it come to certain jobs.

New research from Duke University's Fuqua School of Business, based on experiments involving more than 3,000 participants and published in the journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Process, indicates that veteran job candidates are widely seen as possessing a "calm under pressure and having a get-it-done kind of attitude," according to lead researcher
Aaron Kay.

But while those traits are normally appealing, Kay said that the changing nature of the U.S. economy means that many new jobs "many new types of jobs also require creativity, interpersonal skills and emotional capacity" — traits that civilians assume military veterans fundamentally lack.

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Jacob Leonard (Courtesy photo)

Editor's Note: The following story highlights a veteran at Exelon committed to including talented members of the military community in its workplace. Comcast is a client of Hirepurpose, a Task &Purpose sister company. Learn More.

A civilian job after military life may sound easy at first. There are no early-morning PT sessions and formations, so a regular 9-to-5 job may seem like a dream. But giving up the discipline, organization, and skills you learned in the military will not do you any favors in civilian life. Veterans will be more successful if they approach a civilian job with the same high level of work ethic they were taught in the military.

That's the advice of Jacob Leonard, a former Marine who now works as an accountant at Exelon, supporting the company's nuclear energy generation division.

"Don't drop your pack," he says. "You just can't give up after the military. A lot of veterans go that way, then they lose that sense of belonging."

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Military helicopter pilot Dominic Cipolla walks under the wing of an instruction plane at Coast Flight Training in San Diego, California, U.S., January 15, 2019. Picture taken January 15, 2019. (Reuters/Mike Blake)

CHICAGO (Reuters) - U.S. Army pilot Shaun Perez spent ten hours flying an Apache helicopter over Afghanistan, providing gun cover for Special Forces soldiers on the ground as they hunted for high-value targets, guns and weapons.

Returning to his base at dawn, he donned a fresh uniform before shutting himself into a small room to secure the next stage of his career — as a commercial airline pilot.

He would win the job in a video interview that day in August 2017, joining hundreds of other U.S. military helicopter pilots who have taken attractive offers from domestic airlines trying ease a global pilot shortage.

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Thomas England

Military service takes people all over the globe and offers unique experiences. Those opportunities are invaluable. However, when military service is over, being able to return home is often top priority. For Thomas England, the end goal was to find a job back home in Kansas City so he could provide a stable life for his family. Through Cintas, he found an occasion to do just that and has thrived in the process.

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