These Are The Best (And Worst) Cities For Veterans In 2017

Whether you’ve served one or two enlistments or are retiring after a lengthy career, the transition back to civilian life … Continued

Whether you’ve served one or two enlistments or are retiring after a lengthy career, the transition back to civilian life isn’t always easy; and where you live and the current job market in that area can have a big impact.

At least those are the findings of a new study by WalletHub, which compared 100 of the largest U.S. cities based on 17 factors of livability, affordability, and veteran-friendliness.

The end result? Austin, Texas, is your best bet, followed closely by Colorado Springs, Colorado; Virginia Beach, Virginia; Raleigh, North Carolina; and Piano, Texas.

The cities were ranked by employment opportunities, the local economy, and “veteran friendliness,” which took into account the number of vet-run businesses and the expected growth of a city’s veteran population. Finally, the study calculated the number of Veteran Affairs facilities compared to the number of vets, and the quality of care at VA clinics and hospitals.

Related: These States Have The Highest (And Lowest) Enlistment Rates In America »

Based on those same factors, the worst cities for veterans were Detroit, Michigan; Newark, New Jersey; Baltimore, Maryland; Hialeah, Florida; and Memphis, Tennessee. In terms of job’s alone, Newark placed second to last, and Austin placed first — so if you’re on the fence between those two, maybe head down South toward the lone-star state.

Source: WalletHub

For a top-level breakdown of the report, check out the infographic from WalletHub, below.

Infographic via Wallet Hub

These Are The Best (And Worst) Cities For Veterans In 2017

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James Clark
James Clark

is the Deputy Editor of Task & Purpose and a Marine veteran. He oversees daily editorial operations, edits articles, and supports reporters so they can continue to write the impactful stories that matter to our audience. In terms of writing, James provides a mix of pop culture commentary and in-depth analysis of issues facing the military and veterans community. Contact the author here.

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