Trump told Kim Jong Un he won't let the CIA spy on North Korea

news

President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

(Associated Press/Evan Vucci)

President Donald Trump was asked Tuesday about a Wall Street Journal report that Kim Jong Nam, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's slain half-brother, was a CIA source.

Trump said he had seen the story, but that nothing like that would occur under his watch.

"I saw the information about the CIA with respect to his brother or half-brother, and I would tell him that would not happen under my auspice that's for sure," Trump told a press gaggle before boarding the presidential helicopter.

"I just received a beautiful letter from Kim Jong Un. I can't show you the letter, obviously, but it was very personal, very warm, very nice letter," Trump told the press. "North Korea, under his leadership, has great potential."


Kim Jong Nam was killed with a nerve agent at an airport in Malaysia in February 2017. North Korea has been accused of orchestrating the killing but has officially denied any involvement.

Two women involved in the assassination told courts they believed they were involved in a prank game show during a long and bizarre trial that played out after Kim Jong Nam's death.

CNN White House correspondent Abby D. Phillip, who was at the press gaggle, confirmed to Business Insider that Trump was indeed saying he would not allow the U.S. to use informants against North Korea.

Trump has a long history of attacking the CIA and other intelligence agencies. Notably, Trump sided with Russian President Vladimir Putin during a press conference in Helsinki, Finland, when he took Putin's word that Russia had not meddled in the US elections.

This reportedly sent the CIA into "panic mode." Later, Trump would retract that statement, claiming he misspoke.

Additionally, Trump has repeatedly accepted promises from Kim that the intelligence community warned against. Famously, at their summit in Singapore, Trump took Kim at his word that North Korea would denuclearize.

So far, North Korea has taken no meaningful steps toward dismantling its nuclear weapons and infrastructure but has almost completely stopped the provocative missile and nuclear tests that brought the Washington and Pyongyang on the verge of war in 2017.

Read more from Business Insider:

SEEE ALSO: North Korea Reportedly Billed The U.S. $2 Million In Hospital Expenses For A Man They Murdered

WATCH NEXT: When Trump Met Kim

Trump's recent decisions in northern Syria were ill-advised, strategically unsound, and morally shameful. In rapidly withdrawing U.S. presence and allowing a Turk offensive into Syria, we have left the Syrian Kurds behind, created a power vacuum for our adversaries to fill, and set the stage for the resurgence of ISIS.

Read More Show Less

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - One of the world's largest freshwater fish is protected by the natural equivalent of a "bulletproof vest," helping it thrive in the dangerous waters of the Amazon River basin with flexible armor-like scales able to withstand ferocious piranha attacks.

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego and University of California, Berkeley on Wednesday described the unique structure and impressive properties of the dermal armor of the fish, called Arapaima gigas. They said their findings can help guide development of better body armor for people as well as applications in aerospace design.

Read More Show Less

DELAND, Florida — A military freefall parachuting team has a better reason to conquer Mount Everest than "because it's there."

The 12-member team, assembled by Complete Parachute Solutions of DeLand, will attempt a world record for the highest-elevation tactical military freefall parachute landing. But it's more than a record. It's validation.

"When CPS says we've landed our parachutes at over 20,000 feet, that means we've done it," said Johnny Rogers, the company's vice president.

Read More Show Less

The U.S. military's withdrawal from northeast Syria is looking more like Dunkirk every day.

On Wednesday, the U.S. military had to call in an airstrike on one of its own ammunition dumps in northern Syria because the cargo trucks required to safely remove the ammo are needed elsewhere to support the withdrawal, Task & Purpose has learned.

Read More Show Less

More than 74 years after Marines raised the American flag on Mount Suribachi, Iwo Jima, the Marine Corps has announced that one of men in the most famous picture of World War II had been misidentified.

Read More Show Less