Turkey Held A Bizarre Ceremony To Celebrate Its F-35s — But It Might Not Even Get Them

Military Tech

Turkey held a flamboyant and bizarre ceremony to celebrate its first F-35 Lightning II joint strike fighters, but if the U.S. Senate has its way, those two fighters will be the only ones they get.


Turkey, as well as a host of other U.S. allies, are awaiting the F-35 to replace aging fleets of Cold War-era warplanes and bring them into a networked, futuristic style of aerial combat.

Upon receiving its first-ever F-35s from the U.S., Turkey held a memorable celebration that gave viewers a "taste of Turkey's rich heritage and diverse culture," with a long intro song that depicted skydivers, birds, and ended with a man dressed as a bird or plane doing an aviation-themed dance.

But after the curtain rolled back on Turkey's single F-35, and Turkey's military leaders expressed hope for a powerful and networked new air force, a major question remains: Will Turkey even get its promised 100 F-35s?

How Turkey celebrated its first F-35YouTube/DRAGONFLi Media

Turkey took part in building the F-35, as did many countries. It's an important NATO ally positioned as a bridge between east and west. The U.S. bases airmen and nuclear weapons in Turkey, but lately, the relationship has soured.

There are deep concerns in the U.S. over Turkey's human rights record, Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan authoritarian regime, and Turkey's recent interest in Russian missile defenses.

Turkey is on track to buy Russia's S-400 missile defense system.

Retired US Air Force Lt. Gen. David Deptula told Business Insider that NATO countries "don't want to be networking in Russian systems into your air defenses" as it could lead to "technology transfer and possible compromises of F-35 advantages to the S-400."

Related: How The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter May Have Benefited from Soviet Technology »

If Turkey owned the F-35 and the S-400, it would give Russia a window into NATO's missile defense network and the F-35's next-generation capabilities. Basically, as NATO is an alliance formed to counter Russia, letting Russia patch in would defeat the purpose and possibly blunt the military edge of the most expensive weapons system ever built.

For that reason, and human rights concerns, the  Senate wrote into its Fiscal Year 2019 National Defense Authorization Act that it wanted Turkey's F-35s held back.

Lockheed Martin officials said they still expected the sale to go through and the planes to be delivered, but if the House backs up the Senate, and Trump approves, Turkey could be stuck with only two F-35s for a long time.

Potentially, Turkey may be persuaded by the U.S. to give up on its S-400 purchase from Russia, but it's also possible that a scorned Turkey will go through with the purchase and have a single U.S.-made stealth jet networked into Russian technology.

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