Army National Guard photo

The much-anticipated report from the National Commission on the Future of the Army was released on Jan. 28. In 208 pages of findings, the commission proposed 63 recommendations on force structure, organizational alignment, and balancing of the Total Force. It also took on relationships between the Regular Army, Army National Guard and Army Reserve, offering roadmaps to a more integrated Army. Below are some of the key highlights of the report.

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National Guard photo by 1st Lt. Benjamin Moreau

After nearly two years of bitter skirmishes between the three components of the U.S. Army — Active, National Guard, and Reserve — a congressionally mandated commission of retired Army leaders and Department of Defense officials will study the current force structure of America’s land force and make recommendations on its future composition. Though the National Commission on the Future of the Army was formed as a result of sparring between the three Army components and their interest groups, it presents an opportunity to create an Army capable of meeting the complex security threats our nation faces today and into the 21st century. With the Islamic State still controlling large swaths of Iraq and Syria, renewed uncertainty in Afghanistan and Russia’s perpetuation of “frozen conflicts” along its western border, the need for a decisive land force capable of meeting conventional, asymmetric and hybrid threats is as critical as ever.  So how can the Regular Army, Army National Guard, and Army Reserve work better to achieving that end? Here are four recommendations for the National Commission on the Future of the Army to consider.

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AP Photo by Matt Smith, The Express-Times

Customs and traditions are firmly ingrained in those who serve in the military. Symbols such as our nation’s flag and ceremonies that surround it evoke powerful emotions to service members and veterans. So when I read Will DuVal’s Task & Purpose article on millennials’ problem with patriotism, I completely agreed with his argument that the American flag is often misrepresentative on boardshorts and bikinis and that patriotism gets boiled down a cheap tagline of “U-S-A! U-S-A!” at a frat party. And it’s not just at frat parties. At sporting events, concerts, and political rallies, you can hear the chant over and over again. To some, it can appear cheap and hollow — a cop out to display patriotism without the required investment and sacrifice. But for many, this appears to be the only way to demonstrate such emotion. For millennials who may not have been old enough to serve immediately after the Sept. 11 attacks, how do they spontaneously respond to the death of Osama bin Laden? Are millennials really doomed to show their love of country through half-hearted displays of patriotic fervor?

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