Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

Creating a realistic battle scene — whether it's from World War II or the Napoleonic Wars — demands technical know-how and precise attention to detail.

Paul Biddiss, the military technical adviser on the upcoming World War I movie 1917, taught the actors everything they needed to know, from proper foot care to how to hold a weapon, "which allows the actor to concentrate on his primary task. Acting!" Biddis told Insider.

Biddiss has worked on projects from a variety of time periods — "large Napoleonic battles through to World War I, World War II, right up to modern-day battles with Special Forces," Biddiss said.

Read on to learn about how Biddiss prepared 1917 performers for the gruesome, grueling warfare of World War I.

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Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

The National 9/11 Memorial and Museum's new exhibit, Revealed: The Hunt for Bin Laden, tells the decades-long story of the hunt for one of the world's most notorious terrorists.

Using artifacts from the raid on Osama bin Laden's compound in Pakistan in 2011, as well as from the CIA and FBI, the exhibit shows how the military and intelligence agencies finally found and eliminated the founder of al-Qaeda.

"This is the first time any of the objects from the bin Laden compound have ever been seen in public," Clifford Chanin, the executive vice president and deputy director for museum programs at the 9/11 Museum, told Insider, adding that the artifacts had just arrived from US intelligence agencies the previous week.

While the artifacts may seem like "humble objects" to some, Chanin said, "the backstory of each of these things is very, very special."

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Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

The Russian military successfully launched an intercontinental ballistic missile from its new Borei A-class submarine, the nuclear-powered Knyaz Vladimir, or Prince Vladimir, according to TASS, Russia's state-run news agency.

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Editor's note: This story contains graphic images of children burned in the Turkish-led offensive.

The United Nations is investigating the possible use of chemical weapons in the conflict in northeastern Syria, according to The Guardian's Dan Sabbagh. The Kurdish Red Crescent has raised concerns about Turkish forces and Turkish-supported opposition forces using chemical weapons.

The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) told The Guardian that it was "aware of the situation and is collecting information with regard to possible use of chemical weapons," but cautioned that it has "not yet determined the credibility of these allegations."

The allegations were first reported by Lara Seligman in Foreign Policy.

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Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

On Monday, The New York Times reported that U.S. officials were considering plans to move the U.S. nuclear arsenal from Inçirlik Air Base in Turkey.

This move would be likely to further deteriorate the tense relationship between the U.S. and Turkey, which has rapidly devolved as Turkey invaded northeastern Syria in assault on the Kurdish forces that fought ISIS alongside the U.S.

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Kurdish fighters led the assault on ISIS strongholds across Syria alongside U.S. special operations troops, brutally attacking entrenched ISIS fighters at a devastating cost.

President Donald Trump's decision to pull U.S. troops out of a so-called "safe zone" in northeastern Syria leaves these forces and their compatriots at the mercy of Turkish forces and President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has made no secret of his desire to launch an invasion there. Military leaders say Trump's abandonment of an ally in the fight against ISIS is a grave mistake.

"This policy abandonment threatens to undo five years' worth of fighting against ISIS and will severely damage American credibility and reliability in any future fights where we need strong allies," retired Gen. Joseph Votel, the former head of U.S. Central Command who oversaw the campaign against ISIS, wrote in The Atlantic on Tuesday.

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