Guy Roberts (DoD photo)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

Guy Roberts, the former assistant secretary of defense for nuclear, chemical, biological defense programs, resigned in April, USA Today reported Thursday, in the midst of an investigation by the Pentagon Inspector General into reports of sexual harassment.

A report from the inspector general, released to the public Tuesday, contains allegations of inappropriate touching from three of Roberts' subordinates, including an incident in which Roberts, after a meeting at a restaurant with one subordinate and a government official, hugged the subordinate and kissed her on the cheek. "While hugging [the subordinate] Mr. Roberts whispered 'I love you'" according to the report.

Roberts was accused of several other incidents of sexual harassment, with that employee and others, creating "a hostile, intimidating, and offensive work environment for women" on his staff.

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( DSG Technologies photo)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

A new weapon being tested by the U.S. military could give special operators a more lethal edge by allowing them to shoot underwater, according to Defense One.

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AsSoldier watches as a UH-60 Blackhawk Helicopter prepares to land during an advise and assistance mission in southeastern Afghanistan, Aug. 4, 2019. (U.S. Army/Master Sgt. Alejandro Licea)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

The Washington Post reported this week that a cache of materials about the war in Afghanistan revealed that the U.S. mission there was failing spectacularly, leading to increasing service member and contractor deaths — not to mention tens of thousands of civilian casualties over the past two decades.

The internal documents obtained by the Washington Post have increased scrutiny of one of the most solemn ways the war is felt — the body count. Over 2,300 U.S. troops have died during the course of the war, along with 1,145 NATO and coalition troops. Presently, there are about 13,000 U.S. troops in Afghanistan.

Those tolls are likely exceeded, however, by that of the U.S. contractors who quietly performed some of the war's most dangerous functions — and whose deaths the Pentagon has never felt obligated to report to Americans.

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Members of the National Socialist Movement, one of the largest neo-Nazi groups in the US, hold a swastika burning after a rally on April 21, 2018 in Draketown, Georgia. (Getty Images/Spencer Platt)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

Former Canadian Army Reserve Master Cpl. Patrik Mathews, 26, was first identified as a member of The Base by Winnipeg Free Press reporter Ryan Thorpe.

Days after Thorpe's report was published, Mathews went missing and was discharged from the military for his alleged ties to the group. His car was found about 10 miles from the U.S. border soon thereafter, and police found a cache of weapons when they raided his home.

Vice reporters Ben Makuch, Mack Lamoureux, and Zachary Kamel, citing confidential sources, reported on Thursday that Mathews had been illegally smuggled across the border and is being hidden by members of The Base, which has operated in encrypted chatrooms as a largely online organization.

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A projectile is fired during North Korea's missile tests in this undated picture released by North Korea's Central News Agency (KCNA) on November 28, 2019. (KCNA via Reuters)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

North Korea has again lobbed a vague year-end threat at the Trump administration, saying the United States can expect a "Christmas gift" if talks between U.S. and North Korean officials don't lead to substantive concessions for North Korea.

As the year-end deadline that the hermit kingdom has given the U.S. runs out, North Korea may renege on the only concession it has given President Donald Trump — the promise to abandon nuclear and long-range weapons testing.

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President Donald Trump is interviewed by Fox & Friends cohost Pete Hegseth at the White House, April 6, 2017. (Reuters/Kevin Lamarque)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

President Donald Trump's decision to pardon or reinstate the rank of three warfighters accused or convicted of war crimes went against the advice of his top military officials, relying instead on the advice of outsiders, including Fox News personality Pete Hegseth, The Washington Post reports.

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