Members assigned to Naval Special Warfare Group 2 conducts military dive operations of the East Coast of the United States. (U.S. Navy/Senior Chief Petty Officer Jayme Pastoric)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

A plan to boost the number of elite Navy SEAL platoons that could deploy across the globe remains in limbo months after the effort was halted by a string of high-profile scandals.

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Builder Constructionman Stephen Abernathy, assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 3, shaves at field hygiene station during NMCB-3's field training exercise (FTX). (U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael Lopez)

Editor's note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Sailors might someday be able to get a jump start on the popular veteran-beard look.

The Navy's top personnel leaders said Tuesday that they're open to considering allowing sailors to sport beards, at least when they're not at sea.

"We're getting a lot of feedback from sailors, we're talking to senior leaders and it's not a dead issue," Fleet Master Chief Wes Koshoffer with Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education said during a Facebook live event.

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The amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) departs Naval Station Mayport in preparation of Hurricane Matthew's arrival onto Florida's eastern coast. (U.S. Navy/Petty Officer 2nd Class Mark Andrew Hays)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

A fire broke out on a Navy amphibious assault ship Thursday night, leaving 11 sailors with minor injuries.

Sailors aboard the amphibious assault ship Iwo Jima reported smoke in the cargo hold at 11:45 p.m. The ship was pierside at Naval Station Mayport, Florida, where it's undergoing maintenance.

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Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va. -- The Marine Corps could train as many as eight co-ed companies at boot camp each year, and the general overseeing the effort is hitting back against those complaining that the move is lowering training standards.

"Get over it," Maj. Gen. William Mullen, the head of Training and Education Command told Military.com on Thursday. "We're still making Marines like we used to. That has not changed."

Mullen, a career infantry officer who has led troops in combat — including in Fallujah, Iraq — said Marines have likely been complaining about falling standards since 1775.

"I'm assuming that the second Marine walking into Tun Tavern was like 'You know ... our standards have gone down. They're just not the same as it they used to be,'" Mullen said, referring to the service's famous birthplace. "That has always been going on in the history of the Marine Corps."

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Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Two military bases in Florida and one in Arizona will see heat indexes over 100 degrees four months out of every year if steps aren't taken to reduce carbon emissions, a new study warns.

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Um ... what? (Twitter/Virginia Jones)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Marines are known to take to social media to make fun of some aspects of life in the Corps, but in one recent case, it's affecting change.

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