Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The Marine Corps hasn't done anything like it in decades.

Ten thousand Marines, sailors and NATO troops have descended on Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms in California's Mojave Desert for a massive training exercise.

Read More Show Less

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

A Navy doomsday aircraft that would play a vital communication role in the event of a nuclear war had one of its four engines replaced this month after it struck a bird at a Maryland air station.

Read More Show Less

Editor's note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

On Aug. 16, two 7-ton trucks collided aboard Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, California. Thirty Marines were sent to the hospital.

Read More Show Less

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

One recruit was called a terrorist. Another had his vest stapled to his skin. A third recruit was kicked by a Marine and a drill instructor ordered a fourth trainee to eat a pine cone.

Those are just some of the incidents that led to more than 20 Marines being disciplined at the Corps' West Coast recruit depot since 2017, officials there confirmed. At least two of those Marines are no longer in uniform as the service works to stamp out hazing and abuse at its entry-level training camps. The issue has been a renewed focus since the 2016 death of recruit Raheel Siddiqui at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina.

Read More Show Less
(DoD photo)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

A controversial legal opinion that determined court-martialing military retirees was unconstitutional has been withdrawn.

The Navy-Marine Corps Court of Criminal Appeals will reconsider the case of Stephen Begani, a retired Navy chief petty officer who faced a court-martial after leaving the military. The court also withdrew its July 31 opinion on court-martialing retirees, according to an Oct. 1 order.

Read More Show Less
Cmdr. Jesus Cordero, commanding officer of Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Sicily, Italy, was relieved of command Sept. 27. (U.S. Navy photo)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Investigators probing several allegations of wrongdoing by a Navy officer say they were met with a "disturbing lack of candor," leading them to doubt the validity of the commander's testimony and causing his admiral to question his professionalism.

Cmdr. Jesus "Manny" Cordero, who was relieved of command as the head of Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Sicily last fall, refused to take responsibility for even minor infractions when investigators began looking into several complaints against him, according to a command investigation and endorsement letter, obtained by Military.com through a Freedom of Information Act request.

Vice Adm. Timothy "T.J." White, who relieved Cordero of his duties in September 2018, said the commander made "repeated, vigorous and obvious false statements" during an investigation into his behavior. Those actions severely compromised Cordero's integrity and judgment as a leader," White wrote in a Sept. 27, 2018, relief letter.

Read More Show Less
© 2018 Hirepurpose. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service.