Soldiers with the 1st Infantry Division are just days away from becoming the first to get their hands on the most advanced night vision goggles the Army has fielded yet.

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A soldier who died from health-related issues at Fort Rucker earlier this month was buried on Thursday with full military honors.

1st Lt. William Pickel, 30, was buried at the Chattanooga National Cemetery, his obituary states. He is survived by his wife and two children.

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Acting Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said he agreed with President Donald Trump's decision to cancel his meeting with the Taliban.

McCarthy, speaking at his nomination hearing on Thursday in front of the Senate Armed Services Committee, was asked by Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.). about the White House's "abrupt end" to peace talks, and if the administration's "policy of conducting diplomacy through Twitter" has made it more difficult for the Army in Afghanistan.

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(U.S. Army/Capt. Adan Cazarez)

In early 2001, Ryan McCarthy was on his way out of the Army.

The Army Ranger had been in the infantry since September 1997 and his service obligation had ended. He had the option to get out, and was planning on taking it.

But that, along with everything else, changed on September 11th. His unit was called to Afghanistan, and he decided to stay. Though his former battle buddy Dan Ferris, a retired Army lieutenant colonel who served alongside him in the 75th Ranger Regiment, said it wasn't even a question.

"Ryan was like, 'There's no way in heck that I'm leaving. I'm staying and I'm going with you guys.' He was just completely dedicated to getting out there and defending our country with all of us," Ferris told Task & Purpose.

McCarthy was among the first boots on the ground during the invasion of Afghanistan. After graduating from the Virginia Military Institute, McCarthy went on to serve for five years, deploying to Afghanistan from October 2001-February 2002, and earning three Army Achievement Medals, the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Combat Infantryman Badge, Ranger Tab, and Parachutist Badge, among others.

On Monday, the 45-year-old Army Under Secretary was nominated by President Donald Trump to be the top civilian in charge of the U.S. Army, replacing Mark Esper as Army Secretary, who was confirmed as Secretary of Defense in July.

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U.S. Army

Members of the same family serving together isn't exactly a new concept — for many Americans, the U.S. military is a family business.

But not every family has two generals — and even rarer are those generals sisters.

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AP Photo/Gerry Broome

The Army is investigating a situation surrounding a 19-year-old's recruitment, including claims that his recruiter encouraged him to hide his autism diagnosis.

First reported by Army Times, Garrison Horsley and his father allege that an Army recruiter "encouraged him to hide potentially disqualifying factors in order to enlist as a human resources specialist." Horsley has high-functioning autism and congenital arm disorder that limits the movement in his left arm, Army Times reports; he was also being treated for "a mild episode of recurrent depressive disorder."

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