Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

President Donald Trump on Wednesday defended his decision to abandon the Kurds to a Turkish military incursion in Syria by saying they didn't help the US during World War II.

This came amid reports Turkish ground troops were crossing the border into Syria following airstrikes that began earlier in the day.

"They didn't help us in the Second World War, they didn't help us with Normandy," Trump said of the Kurds. He added, "With all of that being said, we like the Kurds."

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Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

North Korea on Sunday accused the US of "misleading" the public on the status of nuclear talks a day after discussions between the two sides in Stockholm broke down within just hours following an eight-month stalemate.

The North Korean Foreign Ministry said the Trump administration was "misleading the public opinion by touting 'good discussions,'" The Washington Post reported, as it simultaneously warned that if the US does not change its approach by the end of the year then relations between the two countries "may immediately come to an end."

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In this July 2, 2012 file photo, an Iranian Revolutionary Guard speedboat moves in the Persian Gulf near an oil tanker. (Associated Press/Vahid Salemi)

The U.S. launched a cyberattack against Iran in late June that successfully disrupted the ability of Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps to attack oil tankers, according to a New York Times report based on discussions with senior American officials.

The cyberstrike reportedly came the same day President Donald Trump called off military strikes last minute in retaliation for Iran's downing of a U.S. drone. Trump said the strikes would not have been proportionate to the downing of an unmanned aircraft.

Trump had said a cyberoperation was underway, but the New York Times report on Wednesday expanded on the impact of the attack as well as the Trump administration's motives.

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President Donald Trump has ramped up airstrikes against al-Shabab in Somalia. (Associated Press/Farah Abdi Warsameh)

The U.S. military could be guilty of war crimes in Somalia, according to a new report that challenges what the government says about civilian casualties from its bombing campaign against al-Shabab, an al-Qaida affiliate, in the African nation.

The investigation, conducted by Amnesty International, found that US airstrikes from both drones and manned aircraft killed at least 14 civilians and injured seven more people in just five of more than 100 strikes in the past two years.

"The attacks appear to have violated international humanitarian law, and some may amount to war crimes," the Amnesty report said.

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Associated Press/Manuel Balce Ceneta

Former U.S. Sen. Bob Dole, who's 95-years-old, on Tuesday stood up from his wheelchair in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda to salute the casket of former President George H.W. Bush.

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DoD Photo / U.S. Army Sgt. James K. McCann.

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

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